Loading…
2019 TASH Conference
Attending this event?
Each year, the TASH Conference brings together our constituents to share resources and success stories, learn about field-driven best practices, and network within a community engaged in shared values. The Conference is attended by passionate leaders, experts, and advocates from every corner of the disability community. Conference attendees are influential in their fields and communities, and play an important role in the provision of services and supports for the millions of individuals and organizations around the world; and include professors and researchers from leading institutions; those involved in local, state, and federal governments and public policy; special and general educators, and school administrators; self-advocates, adult service providers; students, family members, and many others.  This year’s conference theme, Building Diverse and Inclusive Communities, reminds us that equity, opportunity, and inclusion relies on the input of broad perspectives and experiences.

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Thursday Workshops [clear filter]
Thursday, December 5
 

7:59am

About Thursday Workshops
Thursday Workshops are short-course workshops that are delivered by teams of presenters around a particular topic in an assigned room from 1.5-4 hours. Workshops allow attendees to dive into popular topics in more depth. Workshops will take place on Thursday only.

Thursday December 5, 2019 7:59am - 5:00pm
Sheraton Grand at Wild Horse Pass 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

8:00am

The Difference Five Years (and a lot of hard work) Can Make: One Legacy Organization's Journey from Segregation to Integration
Limited Capacity seats available

Our legacy organization began in 1950 as the Cerebral Palsy School, providing educational services to students not welcomed into the public school system. In the 69 years since, the organization has reinvented itself numerous times, based on mission, trends of the time, and/or funding demands. The most recent and most fundamental transformation began in 2014 at which time the organization provided medically-focused day services to over 100 people in two congregated settings. This presentation tells the story of the five year journey from congregated services to fully integrated, customized supports. The journey is shared by a panel including the Executive Director who presided over the transformation, a person who experienced the transformation, a parent who experienced the transformation, and a board member who drove the transformation.

Presenters
HL

Hope Leet Dittmeier

Executive Director, Mattingly Edge
Supporting people to experience a home of one's own, a good job, and meaningful relationships!


Thursday December 5, 2019 8:00am - 10:00am
Meeting Room: Roadrunner 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

8:00am

Communication Access is a Social Justice Issue
Limited Capacity seats available

In this workshop, presenters and attendees will help to answer the question: What can I do to expand access to communication for everyone across the lifespan? Presenters will examine issues of equity and social justice as they relate to communication access. Our team will examine ways in which attitudinal barriers, structural ableism, and structural racism limit autonomy and communication access for individuals with communication support needs. Presenters will share current data related to access gaps in services, training, and technology, as well as areas where additional research is needed. Finally, we will propose action steps and strategies to be taken by individuals and teams, as well as advocacy at the local, school, state, and national levels. Attendees will have an opportunity to develop their own "action plan" based on dialogue and problem-solving during the session.

Presenters
avatar for Amy Hanreddy

Amy Hanreddy

Associate Professor, Special Education, California State University, Northridge
avatar for Melanie Bailey

Melanie Bailey

Inclusion/SLD Teacher, Mesa Public Schools
I have been in public education for 29 years. I have a dual degree in Elementary and Special Education with a Masters in Elementary Education (all from Northern Arizona University). My calling is truly in the realm of special education and I am a tremendous advocate of inclusive... Read More →
avatar for Pascal Cheng

Pascal Cheng

Education and Communication Specialist, Howard Center
I currently work for the Howard Center in Burlington, Vermont as an educational and communication specialist, providing training and consultation in the areas of augmentative/alternative communication, assistive technology and literacy for children and adults with developmental disabilities... Read More →


Thursday December 5, 2019 8:00am - 12:00pm
Meeting Room: Deer 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

8:00am

TASH Doctoral Students and Early Career Faculty Workshop
Limited Capacity seats available

This Thursday session is meant for you! Come learn about important topics for doctoral students and early career faculty! During this session, nationally-recognized faculty will share their strategies for beginning a successful career as a faculty member in special education. Topics addressed during this session include strategies for succeeding in academia, writing manuscript reviews, establishing a research agenda, obtaining grants and external funding, interviewing for faculty positions, and publishing in RPSD and other journals. This year, we also have a panel session focused on advice for doctoral students.

8:00 - 8:50 am
Strategies for Success in Academia
Jennifer Kurth, Andrea Ruppar
OR
How to Write a Manuscript Review for RPSD and Other Professional Journals
Martin Agran, Susan Copeland
_____________________________________________________________________________
9:00 - 9:50 am
Developing and Sustaining a Research Agenda
Fred Spooner, Martin Agran
OR
Doctoral Student Panel and their TASH Experience
Katie McCabe, Magen Rooney-Kron, Samantha Gross-Toews, Jessica McQueston
_____________________________________________________________________________
10:00 - 10:50 am
The Art (and Science) of Successful Grant Writing
Stacy Dymond, Erik Carter
OR
Interviewing for Faculty Positions
Virginia Walker, Amy Toson, April Regester
_____________________________________________________________________________
11:00 - 11:50 am
Tips for Publishing in RPSD and Other Journals
Stacy Dymond, Donna Lehr, Martin Agran, Fred Spooner, Susan Copeland

Moderators
avatar for Alison Zagona

Alison Zagona

Assistant Professor, University of New Mexico
I am an Assistant Professor at the University of New Mexico, and I am the co-Chair of the TASH Early Career Researcher Network. My research is focused on inclusive education and instructional, social, and behavior supports for students with complex support needs. I am also passionate... Read More →

Presenters
avatar for April Regester

April Regester

Associate Professor, University of Missouri - St. Louis
avatar for Magen Rooney-Kron

Magen Rooney-Kron

Doctoral Student, University of Illinois- Urbana Champaign
Hi! My name is Magen and I am a 3rd year doctoral student at U of I- Urbana Champaign. My research focus is on the employment of people with significant disabilities. I am interested in looking at the use of interagency collaboration and supported employment in supporting students... Read More →
avatar for Virginia Walker

Virginia Walker

Assistant Professor, Department of Special Education and Child Development, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Virginia L. Walker, PhD, BCBA-D, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Special Education and Child Development at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Dr. Walker began her career as a special education teacher of students with extensive support needs in Atlanta... Read More →
avatar for Jennifer Kurth

Jennifer Kurth

Associate Professor, University of Kansas
Inclusive Education
avatar for Andrea Ruppar

Andrea Ruppar

University of Wisconsin-Madison
avatar for Martin Agran

Martin Agran

University of Wyoming
Dr. Martin Agran is a nationally recognized researcher in the area of special education. He is a professor and former department head in the Department of Special Education at the University of Wyoming. Additionally, he served as a professor in the Special Education Departments at... Read More →
SC

Susan Copeland

Professor, University of New Mexico
avatar for Fred Spooner

Fred Spooner

Professor, UNC Charlotte
avatar for Katie McCabe

Katie McCabe

University of Wisconsin-Madison
avatar for Stacy Dymond

Stacy Dymond

Professor, University of Illinois
Stacy Dymond is professor of special education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research focuses on curriculum issues related to educating secondary and transition-age students with severe intellectual disabilities in inclusive school and community settings... Read More →
avatar for Erik Carter

Erik Carter

Professor, Vanderbilt University
Erik Carter is Cornelius Vanderbilt Professor of Special Education at Vanderbilt University. His research and teaching focuses on evidence-based strategies for supporting inclusion, belonging, and valued roles in school, work, community, and congregational settings for children and... Read More →


Thursday December 5, 2019 8:00am - 12:00pm
Meeting Room: Coyote 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

9:00am

Applying Disability Studies Principles in Special Education Coursework
Limited Capacity seats available

Historically, educational practices for students with disabilities have fallen under special education, or what can be referred to as the medical model of disability, which has perpetuated segregation, labeling, and the idea that disability requires a separated and isolated location of schooling (Carrington, 1999) Disability Studies in Education (DSE) perspective, recognizes that educational strategies may need to be differentiated for students with disabilities, as they would for any student (e.g., English language learners, students identified as gifted and talented, etc.). DSE encourages inclusive educational practices and focuses on the strengths and needs of a child, rather than the disability label or diagnosis. This framework prepares educators to view and respond to disability in a different manner, where impairment does not define the individual. In our current field, we prepare prospective educators to examine disability from a medical model framework, one in which you identify a disability, and structure curriculum to focus on closing this perceived educational gap to normalize the individual as much as possible. Because special educators focus on student deficits, and push to help students overcome these deficits, we are caught in the troubling space of, first and foremost, searching for inabilities as we teach. Within the DSE framework, the social model of disability provides an alternative view in the way disability is understood. From a social model of disability perspective, disability is viewed as a difference rather than an abnormality, deficiency, or impairment (Valle & Connor, 2011). The social model of disability focuses on barriers and structures that affect the individual within the environment (McMaster, 2015). These barriers can hinder an individual s ability to obtain equal access than someone without an impairment. Therefore, in an attempt to build a diverse and inclusive classroom community, this session will focus on how to view disability from a social model perspective within a medical model structure and how educators can change their teaching practices.

Presenters
avatar for Audri Gomez

Audri Gomez

Associate Director, Thompson Policy Institute on Disability-Chapman University
avatar for Aja McKee

Aja McKee

Assistant Professor, California State University, Fullerton (CSUF)
Dr. Aja McKee is an Assistant Professor at California State University, Fullerton (CSUF) in the Department of Special Education. She has worked in the public education system since 1998. Her work as a special educator and administrator provides her with practical experience she shares... Read More →


Thursday December 5, 2019 9:00am - 12:00pm
Meeting Room: Eagle 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

9:00am

Humanizing the Planning and Case Management Experience with MyCompass Planning
Limited Capacity seats available

For many years, Skills Society has worked hard to be a fertile ground for fresh ideas, and radical innovations to emerge because of our strong values, focus on continuous learning and the creative culture we have built together. Something that continued to challenge and frustrate us was how bureaucratic and dehumanizing the planning and case management experience can be for people with disabilities. We noticed how people with disabilities and their families can often be left out of the planning process, lacking control and say in the services they receive. We also noticed how conventional planning processes leave little opportunity for creativity and outside the box thinking, making it challenging for people and their supports to come up with meaningful citizenship roles and employment opportunities. In response to these challenges, a decade ago, we set out to explore the following question: How might we transform service planning from what can often be a bureaucratic, dehumanizing and less than engaging experience, into a delightful, insightful and truly meaningful collaboration? Two ideas emerged from these explorations and have evolved to become (1) MyCompass Planning: People Powered Planning, an online suite of case management tools and (2) MyCompass Planning Labs, a disciplined brainstorming process to support goal generation. Both tools incorporate Human Centred Design principles which are about disciplined problem solving and really empathizing, learning, and listening to the people we are trying to design solutions with. Design thinking MyCompass Planning: People Powered Planning MyCompass Planning: People Powered Planning is an online platform (www.mycompassplanning.com) developed by Skills Society, Southern Alberta Community Living Association and Lift Interactive, that humanizes planning and case management. Importantly, the platform was developed with people with disabilities and their supports who provided input, insights, and feedback throughout the entire process. MyCompass Planning makes it easier: For people with disabilities and their families to be at the helm when designing the service they want and deserve To follow up on plans so there is increased accountability that a person's plan is acted upon and achieved To train and enhance the skills of human service workers whose role is central to ensuring plans are high quality and centred on what a person receiving services wants and needs MyCompass is changing the way service organizations approach planning. Rather than being bound by rigid, dehumanizing planning meetings that happen once or twice a year, MyCompass is flexible and adaptable, enabling people and their supports to plan and strategize as life unfolds. MyCompass Planning Labs MyCompass Planning Labs is a think tank process for discovering innovative ways to connect people with disabilities to meaningful citizenship roles and employment opportunities in the community. The Citizen Action Lab is a process that helps unlock creativity in Community Support Workers so they can strengthen their approaches to supporting people with disabilities to uncover and connect with all the things that make life great. Over the years we have refined the think tank process. MyCompass Labs bring support workers together to generate fresh ideas for meaningful citizenship roles and employment opportunities. Over the course of one and half hours, a steward takes the group through a series of disciplined creative processes which enable them to first think and dream big and then slowly refine their ideas into concrete, achievable goals and tasks that can later be entered into an individual's MyCompass plan. The labs spur people to think differently and encourage "outside the box" thinking in 5 life domains: Paid Employment Community Connections Health and Wellness Strengthening Relationships Homelife. Join us for this interactive workshop where you will learn about and experience our approach to humanizing case management and the two processes we have developed: MyCompass Planning and MyCompass Planning Labs. As part of the workshop we will break into small groups and go through a MyCompass Lab process together. After, there will be an opportunity for reflection and sharing as to how human-centred design principles might fit within the context of participant's work.

Presenters
avatar for Paige Reeves

Paige Reeves

Senior Leader of Research and Social Innovation, Skills Society
Passionate about supporting the citizenship of people with intellectual disabilities. Steward of the Skills Society Action Lab (https://www.skillssociety.ca/action-lab/). Curious enough about belonging to do a PhD on it. Chat with me! I'm always keen to meet new people and hear about... Read More →


Thursday December 5, 2019 9:00am - 12:00pm
Meeting Room: Bird 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

9:00am

UDL IRL (In-Real): Frameworks for Creating Sustainable System-Wide Training and Implementation Solutions
Limited Capacity seats available

Although differentiating curriculum though UDL can seem like a daunting task for teachers and administrators, closing the gap between research and practice can be attainable in-real-life. Creating systems that support the implementation of universally designed learning practices begins with understanding site needs, training, technology, and current teaching practices. Using current curriculum maps, and district curriculum, we will show how staff can begin using existing frameworks to support implementing UDL frameworks. Additionally, staff will learn how specific technology solutions effectively support UDL and understand implementation and training barriers often missed. Given limited time and resources, we will identify critical implementation practices that support sustainability, as well as innovative solutions for training. We will discuss how schools can shift the paradigm to support both staff and students in inclusive classrooms by sharing effective teaching practices that empower teachers to efficiently meet the needs of all learners.

Presenters
VD

Vanessa DiCarlo

Founder, IncludED Consulting, LLC


Thursday December 5, 2019 9:00am - 12:00pm
Meeting Room: Gila-Monster 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

9:00am

A Foundation from Social Role Valorization: Framing the Reality and Imagining What is Possible
Limited Capacity seats available

This workshop is designed as an introduction to some of the principles of Social Role Valorization (SRV). SRV is a powerful set of ideas useful in supporting people who are marginalized and excluded to have access to the good things in life by addressing devaluation.

Together, we will discuss the devaluation that people with disabilities live with, the concepts of heightened vulnerability and interpersonal identification, and the numerous other ways we, as a society, cast people into devalued status through an unspoken consensus and overt action.

We will explore the benefits and opportunities that are available when a person has valued social roles and how to focus on valued roles in our visioning and planning tools. Participants will learn and discuss how valued social roles help us access some of the good things in life and how we can better support people with disabilities to acquire, strengthen and maintain valued social roles as a tool for combating devaluation.

Throughout the session workshop, participants will…
  •  Begin to understand some of the principles of Social Role Valorization
  •  Recognize the relationship between segregation and devaluation
  •  Describe how our values are identifiable through our actions
  •  Understand the power that valued social roles can have in the lives of people who live in devalued status
  •  Learn about interpersonal identification
  •  Articulate how mindsets influence our expectations
  •  Understand the necessity of having a big vision in supporting people to have a full, meaningful, inclusive life

Presenters
avatar for Katie Chandler

Katie Chandler

Project Consultant, Sangha Unity Network
Katie is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker who works with Sangha Unity Network as a Project Consultant. Throughout her career, she has worked as a direct support professional, advocate, clinical supervisor, facilitator and consultant. Previously she directed the Developmental Disability... Read More →
avatar for Leslie Lipson

Leslie Lipson

Attorney, Lipson Advocacy: Educational, Legal and Strategy Specialist
Talk to me about advocacy solutions using general educational and special education law, from a values-based foundation and mindset of presuming competence. My practice supports both attorneys and non-attorney advocates to succeed in school-based advocacy. Talk to me about grassroots... Read More →


Thursday December 5, 2019 9:00am - 3:00pm
Meeting Room: Jackrabbit 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

10:15am

Participant Engagement: Nothing About Us Without Us
Limited Capacity seats available

This interactive presentation will provide techniques and best practices currently being used successfully to include people with disabilities and families and enhance diversity and inclusion in policy making and system design efforts currently underway in various states. Participants will learn how to utilize mentors, pre-meetings, meeting space, seating arrangements, reimbursements, and easy read documents to support people with disabilities and families to serve effectively on boards and policy-making bodies as well as identify alternative methods for gaining a more diverse array of input into decision-making. The presentation is based on a national study of Developmental Disability Councils, Protection and Advocacy agencies, University Centers for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities and State Departments of Developmental Disabilities. Every participant will have an opportunity to complete and leave the presentation with a force field analysis of their current situation to identify where to most effectively place their future participant engagement efforts.

Presenters
avatar for Mark Friedman

Mark Friedman

Associate Professor, City University of New York (CUNY)
1. People with disabilities serving on boards of directors and policy making bodies.2. Online teaching.3. Disability Studies


Thursday December 5, 2019 10:15am - 12:00pm
Meeting Room: Roadrunner 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

1:00pm

Community Conversations as an Innovative Approach for Informing Transition Services for Youth with Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Far too many youth with disabilities (especially those with significant disabilities) are not transitioning successfully to careers, college, or community life after high school. Many schools and agencies struggle to design services and supports that elevate the outcomes of transition-age students. We present "community conversation" events as a promising approach for helping school districts identify new partners and possibilities that can strengthen the quality of transition education necessary for building truly diverse and inclusive communities across one state. We will describe core components of the approach and illustrate how it can be applied to inform technical assistance and professional development regarding postsecondary transition across schools. Finally, we will report findings from our mixed-methods study of nine community conversation events across diverse and unique communities. We will describe the perceptions within and across these communities regarding partnerships, training, and other supports needed for youth with disabilities, including those with the most significant support needs, to become contributing members of these communities.

Presenters
MS

Michele Schutz

Doctoral Student, Vanderbilt University
avatar for Erik Carter

Erik Carter

Professor, Vanderbilt University
Erik Carter is Cornelius Vanderbilt Professor of Special Education at Vanderbilt University. His research and teaching focuses on evidence-based strategies for supporting inclusion, belonging, and valued roles in school, work, community, and congregational settings for children and... Read More →


Thursday December 5, 2019 1:00pm - 3:00pm
Meeting Room: Deer 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

1:00pm

Nurturing Community: Showing up with Vision, Hope and Courage
Limited Capacity seats available

Person-Centered Planning was first introduced in the 1980s. It was intended to be a revolutionary act to build diverse and inclusive communities for ALL people. If you don't see Person-Centered Planning as a radical act, then come join our session about reclaiming its roots. Person-Centered practice is not about asking people with disabilities how they want to be supported within our systems and structures. It is about pushing the boundaries of community, one person at a time, so more people can live the good life. Deinstitutionalization has, by itself, failed the people it set out to liberate. Despite decades of implementation, too many people with disabilities continue to live lives that are in the community, but not really part of it. We will talk about the history of community building and why it continues to challenge us; along with service systems, and communities. Together we will examine the question of what is "good enough" when it comes to building community with people with disabilities. What are we willing to accept? How do people's experiences, including our own, shape that measurement? Building inclusive communities requires a commitment to supporting people to discover their gifts and finding the places where those gifts will be received, and where they can shine. This session will offer strategies that are at the core of person-centered work: such as asset mapping, capacity-based thinking, and building valued experiences. We will talk about the role of supporters and the community in building diverse and inclusive communities. This session is part 1 of 2 (see Showing Up with Vision, Hope and Courage Creates& Vision, Hope and Courage.) They are designed to build on each other, but please feel free to join us for one or for both.

Presenters
avatar for Laurie Kimball

Laurie Kimball

Director, KFI South, KFI
Laurie has made a career of facilitating support for people with disabilities to live real lives and participate in socially valued lifestyles in their communities. Laurie's passions are for positive approaches to challenging behavior, person centered services and building community... Read More →
avatar for Lyann Grogan

Lyann Grogan

Director of Training & Outreach, KFI
After ten years of working in a segregated Mental Health setting as a Music Therapist at New Hampshire Hospital and serving as a member of the National Music Therapy Association’s Training Committee LyAnn found inspiration. She was inspired by KFI's mission to provide supports... Read More →


Thursday December 5, 2019 1:00pm - 3:00pm
Meeting Room: Roadrunner 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

1:00pm

Positive Behavior Support at Home: Strategies to Support Family Routines
Limited Capacity seats available

Families are faced with many challenges on a daily basis but frequently the ones that have the most negative impacts on the family system are dealing with challenging behavior at home, school and out in the community. Are we able to get out the door, on time, without a meltdown? Could siblings please just play quietly while I make dinner? Time to clean up or get homework done? How about a trip to the grocery store or an unexpected change in the family routine? Not to mention bedtime! This workshop will be co-presented by Melisa Ruiz, a parent of children with special needs and also the Parent Representative on the Board of the Association of Positive Behavior Support and Kiki McGough, retired educator and mother of three and grandmother of a highly spirited preschooler. She is also the Parent Consultant at the Association of Positive Behavior Support. Using personal examples and the components of effective positive behavior support, participants will work together to analyze routines, identify appropriate strategies and approaches to prevent and respond to challenging behavior within the typical family routines at home and in the community. They will gain a variety of resources to support their children and partner with schools for success.

Presenters
KM

Kiki McGough

PBS Consultant, APBS
I am a retired Special Educator with a focus on behavior who has worked in the field of Positive Behavior Support since 2002. I am particularly interested in PBS in the home and partnerships between school and home to support children and families. I also do dog rescue, particularly... Read More →


Thursday December 5, 2019 1:00pm - 3:00pm
Meeting Room: Coyote 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

1:00pm

Exploring the Evolving Practice of Supported Decision-Making
Limited Capacity seats available

This three-hour session will cover many of the crucial areas of supported decision-making (SDM) practice now taking place in the US and elsewhere. This will include SDM legislative initiatives in the US, SDM being combined with other supports, progress with rights restoration, capacity building with people interested in SDM, SDM in the health care context, educational and capacity building efforts directed to expanding SDM, creating coalitions and alliances to build interests and support in SDM, the continuing emergence of a variety of SDM resources, SDM being targeted to specific groups (e.g. developmentally disabled, elders, people with mental health needs, children, people with communication challenges, families and other supporters of people practicing SDM, etc.), pilot projects involving SDM, protective options that can be easily coupled with SDM, challenges to the quality of SDM practice, and more. The intent for the session is to be exploratory and participatory and would be open to interested people who are initially exploring SDM as well as people with much longer engagement with SDM practice.

Presenters
avatar for Michael Kendrick

Michael Kendrick

Director, Kendrick Consulting Intl
I have been very involved in person centered approaches that result in enriched lives for the person who is the focus. This interest has led to many associated questions such as values based leadership, defining and achieving quality outcomes, embedding people in valued roles in community... Read More →


Thursday December 5, 2019 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Meeting Room: Bird 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

1:00pm

Understanding Meaningful Learning within the Core Curriculum for Children/Youth with Extensive Support Needs
Limited Capacity seats available

The presenters will provide strategies for determining meaningful intellectual goals for children and youth who have extensive intellectual, multiple, and social support needs within the core curriculum. Presenters will also provide participants with an understanding of how to embed additional goals within the activities of the general education core curriculum. A wide range of examples will be shared across English language arts, science, and social studies. Participants will also gain strategies for developing participation and support plans throuh collaboration between special education and general education partners.

Presenters
avatar for Kathy Gee

Kathy Gee

California State University, Sacramento


Thursday December 5, 2019 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Meeting Room: Gila-Monster 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

3:15pm

Showing Up with Vision, Hope and Courage Creates & Vision, Hope and Courage
Limited Capacity seats available

Diverse and inclusive communities, communities that embrace people with disabilities, are the stated "goal" of our service systems. We have lists of best practices and strategies to guide people and their teams through planning to have meaningful lives with real relationships. Why, when we have so many tools and good examples to ground our work, are people still living lives ensconced in the service system with few opportunities to truly belong? It is important to agree on a definition of community, both what it is and what it is not. "Community" is not a location, or a place for an outing. It is not a place to take a trip for the day or go be seen. It is not a trip to the library or the local burger joint. Community is a fellowship of people connected by interests, passions, attitudes, and goals. Community is a collection of people connected by something they share. When we talk about building inclusive communities, we need to be finding the places where people gather around something they have in common, something important to each of them. Those are the places where we begin. Pushing up against the inherent boundaries of community is challenging work. It takes courage, and vulnerability, to envision the possibilities and be a champion for change. The work of building diverse and inclusive communities requires more from us than following a process, no matter how good that process is. Building real community with people is an art. As such, it requires we engage our own hearts as well as our minds. It is only then that we discover the possibilities. Take a walk with us as we explore our roles in building community. We will talk about challenges and perceptions, both internal and external. We will create a space to explore how to tap into the gifts of the person, the team, the community and ourselves to build real community connection. This session is part 2 of 2 (see Nurturing Community: Showing up with Vision, Hope and Courage.) They are designed to build on each other, but please feel free to join us for one or for both.

Presenters
avatar for Laurie Kimball

Laurie Kimball

Director, KFI South, KFI
Laurie has made a career of facilitating support for people with disabilities to live real lives and participate in socially valued lifestyles in their communities. Laurie's passions are for positive approaches to challenging behavior, person centered services and building community... Read More →
avatar for Lyann Grogan

Lyann Grogan

Director of Training & Outreach, KFI
After ten years of working in a segregated Mental Health setting as a Music Therapist at New Hampshire Hospital and serving as a member of the National Music Therapy Association’s Training Committee LyAnn found inspiration. She was inspired by KFI's mission to provide supports... Read More →


Thursday December 5, 2019 3:15pm - 5:00pm
Meeting Room: Roadrunner 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

3:15pm

Teaching Healthy and Safe Friend and Romantic Relationship Skills
Limited Capacity seats available

Diverse and Inclusive Communities are hollow without friendships, romantic relationships, safety, and sexuality. For generations, people with disabilities have been sexually abused, denied romantic relationships and healthy intimacy. Using an educational video (Mike's Crush) and a mechanism to identify healthy and unhealthy situations and behavior students and adults have learned these skills. This author has taught relationship skills, NOT social skills to a wide range of people with intellectual disabilities and autism in schools and in their homes for the past 10 years. The Mike's Crush video and the "Creepy Meter" provide adolescents and adults a mechanism to identify safe and unsafe behavior and situations in themselves and others. These skills facilitate and support safe friendships, romantic relationships, and for some intimacy, touch, and sex. A participant in this healthy relationships program will discuss how it works and its impact on her.

Presenters

Thursday December 5, 2019 3:15pm - 5:00pm
Meeting Room: Coyote 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226
 


Twitter Feed