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2019 TASH Conference
Attending this event?
Each year, the TASH Conference brings together our constituents to share resources and success stories, learn about field-driven best practices, and network within a community engaged in shared values. The Conference is attended by passionate leaders, experts, and advocates from every corner of the disability community. Conference attendees are influential in their fields and communities, and play an important role in the provision of services and supports for the millions of individuals and organizations around the world; and include professors and researchers from leading institutions; those involved in local, state, and federal governments and public policy; special and general educators, and school administrators; self-advocates, adult service providers; students, family members, and many others.  This year’s conference theme, Building Diverse and Inclusive Communities, reminds us that equity, opportunity, and inclusion relies on the input of broad perspectives and experiences.

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Breakout Sessions [clear filter]
Friday, December 6
 

9:44am

About Breakout Sessions
Breakout Presentations are delivered in assigned meeting rooms for 50 minutes.

    Friday December 6, 2019 9:44am - 11:45am
    Sheraton Grand at Wild Horse Pass 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    9:45am

    Advocacy in the Modern World: Building your Advocacy Toolbox
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Teaching Self advocacy skills is one of the most important things we can do in our community. It' s not only teaching someone how to make sure they are getting the right services but it also gives them pride and joy when they can advocate for themselves. These skills are easily taught and we must make sure we are teaching them to the disability community. Come learn about your Self advocacy toolbox and learn how to use your resources to not only advocate for yourself but also learn to advocate for them community.

    Presenters

    Friday December 6, 2019 9:45am - 10:35am
    Meeting Room: Quail 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    9:45am

    Being Counted; and Making That Count
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Building diverse and inclusive communities means that federal and state agencies have robust information on the needs of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). As long as people are not included and counted in national surveys, and administrative state data on their needs are not being analyzed, the needs of people with IDD will not be adequately addressed and equity will not be achieved. Health information is especially missing. This session describes recent efforts across HHS agencies, self-advocates, advocates, and researchers: a) to improve information on population health and health needs of people with IDD, b) to identify directions for future actions. Based on two white papers developed for the Administration for Community Living (ACL), the recommendations specifically recommend better information on race and ethnicity, and to improving data for the U.S. territories. Other directions include areas that need to be measured in health surveys to be able to identify people with IDD, examples of promising practices in using state level data to develop better local information. An Easy Read version of the white papers is available.


    Friday December 6, 2019 9:45am - 10:35am
    Meeting Room: Deer 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    9:45am

    Collaborative Planning in Action! General Educators as Implementers of Instruction
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Many students with severe disabilities are included in the general education classroom for some part of their instructional day. General educators rarely receive strong training to support these students and need guidance on how best to plan for their participation. A multiple probe across participants design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of collaborative planning with ongoing consultation to increase interactions and instructional behaviors between four diverse general educators and middle school students with severe disabilities in a metropolitan school district. The collaborative planning intervention increased general educators' instructional behaviors toward the students and students' academic engagement with class content. General educators were successful in taking a more active role in planning and delivering instruction to the students with severe disabilities. Implications are offered for improving procedural fidelity within individualized interventions, ensuring sustainability in the absence of researcher involvement, and preparing educators as collaborators.

    Presenters

    Friday December 6, 2019 9:45am - 10:35am
    Meeting Room: Gila-Monster 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    9:45am

    Does All mean All? Expert Perspectives of Inclusion in SWPBIS
    Limited Capacity seats available

    School-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (SWPBIS) is a framework intended to benefit all students in a school. However, recent research suggests that students with significant disabilities may not fully participate in SWPBIS efforts at their school. The purpose of this study was to investigate expert perspectives on the extent to which students with significant disabilities should be included in SWPBIS initiatives at their school. We surveyed the editorial board members of the Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions in an effort to learn about their background and expertise in SWPBIS and the extent to which they agree that students with significant disabilities should be involved in each aspect of SWPBIS. Overall, experts agreed students with significant disabilities should be included in all tiers of SWPBIS, they should receive instruction in school-wide rules and expectations, and they should have the opportunity to participate in school-wide reward systems. Experts shared differing perspectives on the ways behavior violations of students with significant disabilities should be managed and documented. Implications and directions for future research are presented, including the need to explore effective strategies for supporting practitioners to implement SWPBIS for all students including students with significant disabilities. Information from this session can be used to advance the inclusion of individuals with significant disabilities in SWPBIS.

    Presenters
    avatar for Alison Zagona

    Alison Zagona

    Assistant Professor, University of New Mexico
    I am an Assistant Professor at the University of New Mexico, and I am the co-Chair of the TASH Early Career Researcher Network. My research is focused on inclusive education and instructional, social, and behavior supports for students with complex support needs. I am also passionate... Read More →
    avatar for Kirsten Lansey

    Kirsten Lansey

    Doctoral Student, University of Arizona
    avatar for Jennifer Kurth

    Jennifer Kurth

    Associate Professor, University of Kansas
    Inclusive Education
    avatar for Virginia Walker

    Virginia Walker

    Assistant Professor, Department of Special Education and Child Development, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
    Virginia L. Walker, PhD, BCBA-D, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Special Education and Child Development at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Dr. Walker began her career as a special education teacher of students with extensive support needs in Atlanta... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 9:45am - 10:35am
    Meeting Room: Eagle 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    9:45am

    Getting Published in Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities (RPSD)
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Come meet the editors of Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities (RPSD) to learn more about publishing in the journal associated with TASH! RPSD publishes innovative research that furthers understanding about how to improve the lives of people with severe disabilities. This session is designed for anyone conducting research or aspiring to conduct research in the field of severe disabilities. The session will provide an overview of the types of manuscripts published in RPSD and the peer review process, followed by time for participants to ask questions and obtain input on their publication ideas.

    Presenters
    avatar for Stacy Dymond

    Stacy Dymond

    Professor, University of Illinois
    Stacy Dymond is professor of special education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research focuses on curriculum issues related to educating secondary and transition-age students with severe intellectual disabilities in inclusive school and community settings... Read More →
    avatar for Erik Carter

    Erik Carter

    Professor, Vanderbilt University
    Erik Carter is Cornelius Vanderbilt Professor of Special Education at Vanderbilt University. His research and teaching focuses on evidence-based strategies for supporting inclusion, belonging, and valued roles in school, work, community, and congregational settings for children and... Read More →
    avatar for Fred Spooner

    Fred Spooner

    Professor, UNC Charlotte


    Friday December 6, 2019 9:45am - 10:35am
    Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 2 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    9:45am

    Leadership Development for Self-Advocates: Expanding and Growing Together
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Project ACTION! is a successful well-established self-advocacy group in Washington, DC. As its leaders, we realized that we need many more self-advocacy leaders if we were going to address all of the issues we hear about at monthly meetings AND if we are going to create needed changes. We want to be at the tables where decisions are made. There are so many Boards, committees and workgroups at which we want to be represented. Therefore, Project ACTION! has done a number of things that have been successful. This interactive session will provide strategies to train new leaders and develop a pipeline of secondary leaders. Project ACTION! leaders have designed and provided our own leadership training, provide training on serving on board and committees, supported people to testify at public hearings, recruited members who have completed DC Advocacy Partners, developed a 6-month leadership training program and recruited current and potential members interested in taking charge of their lives and making changes that are important to them. We also typically lead and serve in pairs so that we can support each other and mentor new leaders. Some changes we address relate to programs, services and systems. Other changes focused on relationships, attitudes of others, limited opportunities and not being treated with respect. Examples of leadership training topics are Finding Your Voice; Identifying Issues that are Important to You; and Taking Charge of Your Life; Running and Participating in Meetings; Serving on Boards; Talking So That People Will Listen, and more. Our trainings involve fun interactive role-playing, so that people can practice and learn in a safe non-threatening places. We also pair new self-advocates with more experienced self-advocacy leaders, who can help them practice new skills and build their confidence. This session will help self-advocates and their allies and supporters to learn new approaches to leadership development, and will provide time for participants to share additional strategies.


    Friday December 6, 2019 9:45am - 10:35am
    Meeting Room: Ant 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    9:45am

    Making it Happen: Transition to Adulthood for Youth with Significant Disabilities
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Whether you are a transition coordinator (also called transition specialists, facilitators, and administrators) or a secondary special secondary educator, preparing your students for life after school is a very challenging role. This important work to support students to succeed, achieve, and realize a successful future requires skills practitioners. This session will help you to answer the question, "Now what do I do?" if your role in supporting students seems overwhelming or when you need concrete solutions on what to do next. This session will share a range of strategies, resources and information with participants about how to support effective, high quality and evidence-based transition practices and programs. Effective transition programs can be designed to address a wide range of transition education and services for students with disabilities. Because of the complexity of transition, no one professional can sufficiently impact or provide the variety of needed services and supports. We will review the different roles in transition and how participants can focus on unique elements of the bigger process, depending on whether they are a secondary special educator, transition coordinator, an educational or adult agency professional, or transition stakeholder (e.g., family members). Understanding all of the critical features of high-quality transition programs may seem daunting, and to break down what makes a transition program effective, we will structure this session to address essential quality indicators of transition programs and clarify who is best suited to coordinate and implement each critical component.

    Presenters
    avatar for Mary Morningstar

    Mary Morningstar

    Professor, Portland State University
    Dr. Mary E. Morningstar is an associate professor in the Department of Special Education at Portland State University and Director of the Transition Coalition, which offers online, hybrid and in-person professional development and resources for secondary special educators and transition... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 9:45am - 10:35am
    Meeting Room: Buzzard 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    9:45am

    Mediation and Litagation to Obtain Inclusive Education
    Limited Capacity seats available

    The presenters, a disability rights attorney and a former professor, researcher, and expert in inclusive education, will share their successes and struggles with assisting families to obtain inclusive education for their sons and daughters with significant disabilities. Schools and school districts are sometimes reluctant to provide inclusive education for students with significant disabilities. The presenters, using past litigation decisions, including the Endrew F. decision as well as expert witness testimony will share their journey for making inclusive education possible for several students.

    Presenters
    DG

    David German

    Special Education Attorney, Newman Aaronson Vanaman LLP


    Friday December 6, 2019 9:45am - 10:35am
    Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 1 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    9:45am

    Olmstead 20: LONG ROAD HOME
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Long Road Home is a self-advocacy project to celebrate and promote awareness of Olmstead and to start conversations about Olmstead compliance. Long Road Home started in 2004 in Georgia and now has been done in eight states. We will look at the importance of self-advocacy in the Olmstead case and how self-advocates made a difference. We will take a brief look at the nursing transition and discuss the 24-hour care myth which is a key point when discussing future system change.

    Presenters
    avatar for Cheri Mitchell

    Cheri Mitchell

    Advocate/Member, GA Advocacy Office/ People First of GA
    Cheri Mitchell is first and foremost a Self-Advocate. She has spent the last twenty years working on behalf of people with disabilities and people who are elderly, and mentoring and supporting self-advocates across Georgia and the nation. She is dedicated to helping people get out... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 9:45am - 10:35am
    Meeting Room: Roadrunner 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    9:45am

    Redefining "Significant Disabilities": Reducing the Lifespan Impact of Disparities Experienced by People of Color with Significant Disabilities
    Limited Capacity seats available

    People of Color (PoC) with significant disabilities experience the highest negative rates in nearly ever quality of life category: morbidity and mortality, income, education, employment, housing, self-determination, institutionalization, etc. The disparities are grounded and reinforced by the synergy of social, attitudinal, and political factors external to the individual. Should institutional racism, cultural incompetency, and benign colorblindness be incorporated into redefinition of "significant disability"? If so, what are the implications for research, policy and systems change?

    Presenters

    Friday December 6, 2019 9:45am - 10:35am
    Meeting Room: Scorpion 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    9:45am

    Relationships and Intimacy: A Louisiana Collaborative Initiative
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Sexuality is a fundamental part of being human, and sexual development begins at birth and continues throughout our lives. Individuals with developmental disabilities deserve to obtain knowledge about their physical, emotional, and social development regarding sexuality, and have the freedom to learn about these things in an atmosphere that is non-judgmental, free of fear, shame, and exploitation. Caregivers struggle with discussing the topic but also with how to present the information in a way that the person with developmental disability will understand. Thus, it is necessary to empower caregivers, so they can empower the people they care for. Participants in this training will: Increase knowledge about how messages impact sexuality; Increase knowledge about how disability impacts sexual development; Examine how the values professionals and caregivers have impact our ability to discuss sexuality with people with disabilities; Review effective ways to answer questions about sexuality & techniques in responding to behaviors; and Increase knowledge about techniques to support sexuality of people with developmental disabilities. This session will provide participants with an overview of the collaborative initiative between Team Dynamics, LLC and the Louisiana Developmental Disabilities Council to address abuse and exploitation of people with developmental and intellectual disabilities.

    Presenters
    avatar for Sharon Delvisco

    Sharon Delvisco

    Training and Education Coordinator, Team Dynamics, LLC
    Sharon Delvisco has over 30 years of experience planning meetings, conferences, facilitating retreats, providing training and education. She is currently employed as an Event Planning Associate and Training & Education Coordinator for Team Dynamics, LLC in Louisiana. She has received... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 9:45am - 10:35am
    Meeting Room: Horse 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    9:45am

    Research on the Learning Outcomes for Matched Pairs of Children in Inclusive vs. Segregated Programs
    Limited Capacity seats available

    This presentation will be focused on data from a two-part study of matched pairs of children/youth with extensive support needs. Specifically, 15 children/youth who were included for more than 80% of their day in general education classrooms, and 15 children who were educated in segregated classrooms. Last year, the data from part one of the study were shared. The focus was on observational data of a typical school day for the matched pairs. This year our focus will be on part 2 in which we studied the educational progress/outcomes for the matched pairs of children. A content analysis was completed in which data from the first full IEP was compared to the last IEP at the time of the study. A panel of experts was then asked to anonymously rate the level of progress for each child, without being told whether this child was educated in an inclusive or segregated program. The data was then statistically analyzed. Results will be shared with the participants, and time for discussion will be provided. Our team includes a University researcher and two school district administrators, so reflection on policy and practice will be shared.

    Presenters
    avatar for Kathy Gee

    Kathy Gee

    California State University, Sacramento


    Friday December 6, 2019 9:45am - 10:35am
    Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 3 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    9:45am

    TALK TO ME: What Educators and Support Workers can Learn about De-escalation from Hostage Negotiators
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Hostage negotiators must quickly establish trust, build rapport, and foster collaboration with barricaded, suicidal and even homicidal individuals in extreme crisis situations. They are successful in resolving more than 90% of both domestic and international situations they are called upon to negotiate, and they are able do so without injury, loss of life or the use of coercion. After a year of conversations with prominent hostage negotiators all over North America about the relational, communication-based approaches they use, Emma Van der Klift outlines what she's learned and shares some of these insights and skills and shares how this information can be applicable for support workers and teachers.

    Presenters
    avatar for Emma Van der Klift

    Emma Van der Klift

    Broadreach Training and Resources
    Although Norman Kunc and Emma Van der Klift are well known speakers and advocates within the disability rights community, they prefer to think of themselves as modern day storytellers, continuing the long held tradition of using humour and narrative to initiate self-reflection and... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 9:45am - 10:35am
    Meeting Room: Rattlesnake 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    9:45am

    The Power of Perseveration
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Reflecting back on what I have been taught by my son in his 45 years of life (so far) I realize that he has raised me as much or more than I have raised him. I have learned that the primary drive of human beings is to connect with others and that drive creates communication even where it is least anticipated possible. I will describe my voyage of discovery and his role in guiding that voyage. As I enter the last quarter century of my life, I will focus on how to ensure that he will always have that opportunity to continue to connect and influence his own life and the lives of others with whom he interacts.

    Presenters
    SY

    Susan Yuan

    President, The Association for Successful Parenting
    I am the mother of a 45-year old man who has Angelman Syndrome and who types to communicate, with me as his primary facilitator. My academic field is Psychology, with emphasis on Family Support. In the past 2 decades, I have been very involved with advancing the rights of parents... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 9:45am - 10:35am
    Meeting Room: Bird 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    9:45am

    The Time is Now: APSE Universal Employment Competencies
    Limited Capacity seats available

    This interactive session will provide an explanation of APSE's updated competencies that were released in early 2019. APSE first developed and adopted supported employment competencies in 2001. The significant shifts in the policy and practice landscape for employment services require that APSE periodically review these competencies. APSE's Professional Development Committee reviewed and revised these competencies in 2018 to ensure they reflect current best practices and standards in the field of employment support. As a result, APSE presents an updated, universal, set of competencies for employment professionals across that U.S. that reflect the evolving knowledge and skill sets needed to support job seekers with disabilities to find, secure, and succeed in the competitive job market. We will explore the changes in the competencies and how they can be used to improve services from a top-down level. We will review language updates using competitive, integrated employment and the importance of "universal" competencies and approach in three areas (SE, CE, Self Employment). Throughout the session, national groups and coalitions working in the areas of competency and skills development will be acknowledged and provided as resources. We will draw a connection between knowledge and skills that are critical to make Employment First a reality nationwide.

    Presenters
    avatar for Kelly Nye-Lengerman

    Kelly Nye-Lengerman

    Research Associate, University of Minnesota
    avatar for Erica Belois-Pacer

    Erica Belois-Pacer

    Professional Development Director, APSE National


    Friday December 6, 2019 9:45am - 10:35am
    Meeting Room: Coyote 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    10:55am

    30 Years of Advocating and Influencing Positive Change for Inclusive Communities
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Project ACTION! is a regional self-advocacy coalition of adults with developmental disabilities that has been active for over 30 years in Washington, DC, Maryland and Virginia. Since their inception, Project ACTION! has focused on "Building Diverse and Inclusive Communities" for the people they advocate with to have their voices heard and interests represented. The Project ACTION! presenters will share how they have successfully advocated for change in the government system that provides their disability supports over the years. The presenters will share how they choose to work with non-disability coalitions and other groups to ensure they have a seat at the table. They will talk about the importance and impact of cross-collaboration so even more people will know about the needs of people with disabilities.

    Presenters
    avatar for Phyllis Holton

    Phyllis Holton

    Deputy Director, Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities


    Friday December 6, 2019 10:55am - 11:45am
    Meeting Room: Ant 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    10:55am

    Analyzing the Complexity of Factors When Making Placement Decisions
    Limited Capacity seats available

    This presentation overviews a recently funded Institute of Education Science grant that is examining the complexity of factors that influence, if not shape and determine, educational placement decisions for elementary level students with severe disabilities. These factors (or measures) include academic, social, and behavioral assessments; classroom, cultural, and district demographic and socio-economic variables; school climate; instructional best practices and teaching arrangements; intensity and types of support systems; and student-teacher/classmates' interactions. Central to the purposes of this research is developing an empirical understanding of the relationship between educational placement and learner outcomes. Findings should help districts, schools, and families plan for placement and instructional practices that better serve students with extensive support needs.

    Presenters
    avatar for Mary Morningstar

    Mary Morningstar

    Professor, Portland State University
    Dr. Mary E. Morningstar is an associate professor in the Department of Special Education at Portland State University and Director of the Transition Coalition, which offers online, hybrid and in-person professional development and resources for secondary special educators and transition... Read More →
    avatar for Martin Agran

    Martin Agran

    University of Wyoming
    Dr. Martin Agran is a nationally recognized researcher in the area of special education. He is a professor and former department head in the Department of Special Education at the University of Wyoming. Additionally, he served as a professor in the Special Education Departments at... Read More →
    avatar for Jennifer Kurth

    Jennifer Kurth

    Associate Professor, University of Kansas
    Inclusive Education
    avatar for Alison Zagona

    Alison Zagona

    Assistant Professor, University of New Mexico
    I am an Assistant Professor at the University of New Mexico, and I am the co-Chair of the TASH Early Career Researcher Network. My research is focused on inclusive education and instructional, social, and behavior supports for students with complex support needs. I am also passionate... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 10:55am - 11:45am
    Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 2 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    10:55am

    Be Determined to Be Yourself
    Limited Capacity seats available

    How many times have you asked yourself, "what am I going to be when I grow up?", or "how will I ever get this done?", maybe even "I don't even know where to start...". These are all common questions and thoughts that are frequently on the minds of people with and without disabilities. Parents, educators, and employers take for granted the skills needed to have a goal, create a strategy, monitor progress, and then adjust as needed. Unfortunately, these skills are not being taught in school and students are feeling the effects. Self-determination skills are a valuable set of tools that all students should be taught and are skills that should be reinforced throughout a person's lifespan. When people are taught the skills needed to advocate for themselves poor choices are minimized, graduation rates go up, drop out rates go down, and long term employment is achieved. Through this presentation, attendees will learn how to incorporate self-determination strategies from Pre-K through adulthood. Attendees will also learn about the resources and activities available to them to help foster independence and self-advocacy skills needed to function in today's society.

    Presenters
    avatar for Brynn Biggs

    Brynn Biggs

    Transition Specialist, Bryan ISD
    Howdy!I am a wife and mother to 2 beautiful girls and 1 handsome boy. I am currently the transition specialist for Bryan ISD in Bryan, Texas. I have been in the special education field for 9 years and have always taught secondary level. I am also a person with disabilities (Tourette... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 10:55am - 11:45am
    Meeting Room: Quail 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    10:55am

    Building an Inclusive Postsecondary Program to Support Students and Families
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Inclusion is a core value at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, and we use it as a guiding principle. We state in our values that as a community we believe that celebrating and appreciating diversity isn't enough. We strive to create a truly inclusive community, one where equity is reality. We recognize individual attributes and respect individual differences, all while firmly asserting that we are better together. UMSL built a diverse and inclusive community when they developed the UMSL Succeed Program, one of over 270 inclusive higher education programs serving students with intellectual and development disabilities across the U.S. Developed six years ago, the UMSL Succeed Program was built to support students to live, learn, work, play and grow into self-determined adults. The lessons learned from building this diverse learning community show the impact that inclusive postsecondary education has on postsecondary programs and the campuses that house them. In the process of building the Succeed Program, a team of stakeholders came together to work within UMSL to create this diverse learning community that supported students, families, and the University. This presentation will provide an overview of how the Succeed Program was developed, how we learned to support the key stakeholders, and developed a family support program. During the session we will focus on key supports that assist students in transitioning to post-secondary education. The session will be useful to students and families looking to understand the range of approaches to campus living and the necessary supports to ensure inclusivity, and will provide practical strategies and tips for practitioners in inclusive higher education seeking to offer inclusive campus housing.

    Presenters
    avatar for Lindsay Athamanah

    Lindsay Athamanah

    Assistant Professor, University of Missouri - St. Louis
    avatar for April Regester

    April Regester

    Associate Professor, University of Missouri - St. Louis


    Friday December 6, 2019 10:55am - 11:45am
    Meeting Room: Rattlesnake 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    10:55am

    Changing a District Culture from Segregation to Inclusion
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Michele Gardner, Director of Special Services for the Berkeley Heights Public Schools and adjunct professor at The College of New Jersey, will focus on the responsive and proactive delivery of professional development to a wide range of audiences-related services, Child Study Team, general education teachers, special education teachers, paraprofessionals and administrators. Participants will learn about the needs of various groups of professionals and the importance of support & collaboration with the Special Services department. The importance of slowly building the inclusive culture of the district will be emphasized. Creating an inclusive culture starts with ensuring that the professionals who will be responsible for the delivery and supervision of instruction have what they need to be successful and understand the premise on which the major provisions of IDEA were created. An outline of potential training topics will be shared, along with personal stories of how collaboration, careful use of resources and professional development changed the way both educators and typically developing students viewed their role in supporting students with disabilities. Finally, participants will learn how to utilize the natural resource of typically developing peers to advocate for and assist with the education of students with more significant disabilities.

    Presenters
    avatar for Michele Gardner

    Michele Gardner

    Director of Special Services, Berkeley Heights Public Schools
    AC

    Annie Corley-Hand

    Principal, Berkeley Heights BOE


    Friday December 6, 2019 10:55am - 11:45am
    Meeting Room: Gila-Monster 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    10:55am

    Communication Support in Real Life
    Limited Capacity seats available

    People with little or no reliable speech receive (if fortunate) communication support during school ... but what happens after that, when real life begins? This panel of self-advocates and communication partners will present how this type of support happens in college, at work, on dates, during medical appointments, while traveling, and more. Self-advocates will bring pre-composed introductions and questions for the audience, and the entire panel will take live questions and facilitate discussion. Adult topics are encouraged, including relationships, sex, family challenges, etc.

    Presenters
    avatar for Molly K. Rearick

    Molly K. Rearick

    Founder & Executive Director, IGNITE Collective, Inc.


    Friday December 6, 2019 10:55am - 11:45am
    Meeting Room: Bird 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    10:55am

    Comparing Education Experiences among Diverse Parents of Children with Disabilities
    Limited Capacity seats available

    In this presentation, we discuss findings from a research study with English and Spanish-speaking parents of children with significant disabilities. Specifically, we compared special education experiences, parent-school communication, and desired changes to special education law between English and Spanish-speaking parents. To do this, we conducted 12 focus groups with nearly 68 parents of children with disabilities in two states. Specifically, 56 parents were English-speaking and 12 parents were Latino and Spanish-speaking. Using constant comparative analysis and emergent coding, we reviewed the focus group data. We found that Spanish (versus English) speaking families reported worse special education experiences; specifically, they were more likely to report experiences of discrimination and bias. Also, Spanish (versus English) speaking families reported more barriers to parent-school communication. Finally, both groups of participants requested changes to special education law and were committed to systemic advocacy.

    Presenters
    avatar for Meghan Burke

    Meghan Burke

    Associate Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    avatar for Dr. Zach Rossetti

    Dr. Zach Rossetti

    Boston University Wheelock College of Education & Human Development
    Zachary Rossetti, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Special Education in the Boston University Wheelock College of Education & Human Development. His research examines the experiences of families with children with intellectual and developmental disabilities, including autism, by... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 10:55am - 11:45am
    Meeting Room: Scorpion 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    10:55am

    Is an Individualized Education Program a Nonhuman Agent? Rethinking Deficit
    Limited Capacity seats available

    This presentation hopes to demonstrate the hallmark document of the Individualized Education Program (IEP) as a nonhuman agent, rendering students eligible for special education services in the United States as less intelligible as human, as not fully human, and as reproducing inequitable power structures in education. Bringing the IEP's agency to light, the authors will reframe the medical model of disability that prevails in special education to more in line with the social model of disability in which barriers from society, environments, and structures constitute individuals as different.

    Presenters

    Friday December 6, 2019 10:55am - 11:45am
    Meeting Room: Horse 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    10:55am

    Navigating through the Complex Waters of HCBS Waivers: Learning from Successful Navigators and Charting New Frontiers
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Perhaps the most important U.S. public policy ever for "Building Diverse and Inclusive Communities" in regard to people with intellectual disability and related development disabilities occurred in 1981 when Congress authorized the Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver program. The HCBS Waiver provided an alternative to the Intermediate Care Facility (ICF) program (with its clear "institutional bias") by allowing Medicaid funds for Long Term Services and Supports to be spent supporting people to live in their local communities. It took until 2001 for HCBS spending to surpass ICF spending, but the latest figures show that spending for HCBS waivers (34.5 billion) is now more than three times that of the ICF program (11.0 billion). The growth of HCBS waivers does not mean that the path to accessing funding is easy or straightforward for people with disabilities or family members. Long waiting lists for HCBS waiver services (i.e., people wanting waivers exceeds the available supply) have been a perpetual problem, and the fact that states have their own rules and there are so many varieties of HCBS waivers adds to the complexity of accessing the services. This session will include two presentations on the HCBS waiver. Findings from in-depth interviews with 10 families who have successfully navigated the HCBS waiver process forms the basis for the first presentation. Themes from interview data will be shared, and guidance for families seeking HCBS waivers as well as recommendations for policymakers will be provided. The second presentation reports findings from focus group interviews to gather insights on assessment items that can be used to determine the number and type of supports that can be provided through HCBS waiver programs serving people with intellectual disability and related developmental disabilities compared to HCBS waiver programs serving people with aging-, physical-, and mental health-related disabilities. The similarities and differences in assessing support needs that were aligned with different disability populations has important implications for how disability is understood and establishing support priorities for different disability groups.

    Presenters
    avatar for James Thompson

    James Thompson

    Professor, University of Kansas
    James R. Thompson, Ph.D., serves as a Professor on the faculty of the Department of Special Education at the University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, U.S. He is Editor of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and is a past-president of the American Association on Intellectual and... Read More →
    avatar for Sarah Carlson

    Sarah Carlson

    Graduate Research Assistant / PhD Candidate, University of Kansas
    I am a doctoral candidate in the Department of Special Education at the University of Kansas. Through my research, I seek to identify and understand factors influencing the post-school outcomes of adults with intellectual disability and their families. My research centers around understanding... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 10:55am - 11:45am
    Meeting Room: Deer 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    10:55am

    Predictors of Higher Education Outcomes for Students with Intellectual Disability
    Limited Capacity seats available

    More than 3000 students with intellectual and developmental disabilities have enrolled in college via the Transition and Postsecondary Programs for Students with Intellectual Disability (TPSID) projects. We present results from new analyses of TPSID data, focused on the predictors of inclusive course enrollments and employment as well as data on outcomes of students who have completed these programs. The findings from these studies suggest that access to typical higher education systems and practices and paid employment are associated with more successful outcomes. In this session, we offer recommendations for translating these findings into practice and directions for future research. The Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008 created grants for Transition and Postsecondary Programs for Students with Intellectual Disability (TPSID) model demonstration projects, implemented between 2010 and 2015 at 57 colleges and universities and currently being implemented from 2015 to 2020 at over 40 campuses in the U.S. The National Coordinating Center (NCC) for the TPSIDs will present the results of the following new analyses of data from the model demonstration projects, focused on the experiences and outcomes of students who attended TPSID projects: 1: Predictors of student employment during their program and at exit for students who attended TPSID projects between 2010 and 2015. 2: Predictors of inclusive course enrollments for first-year students who attended TPSID projects in 2015-16 and 2016-17. 3: One-year outcomes of students who attended TPSID programs funded between 2015 and 2020. Collectively, these studies have important implications for understanding factors that can support access to inclusive academics and paid employment as well as the overall impact of inclusive higher education. Participants will gain a deeper understanding of the effective structures, practices, and supports that the TPSIDs are using to assist students in achieving successful outcomes. For families and students, understanding these practices will assist them in asking critical questions of programs during the college search process, in particular around inclusivity and opportunities for paid employment. Colleges and universities will be able to use the recommendations in this session to improve practice.


    Friday December 6, 2019 10:55am - 11:45am
    Meeting Room: Buzzard 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    10:55am

    Reverse Job Fairs: Turning the Tables for Job Seekers with Disabilities
    Limited Capacity seats available

    A reverse job fair is an innovative job recruitment event that puts job seekers with disabilities in a position to showcase their talents and experience to local employers and recruiters. Unlike a typical job fair where businesses set up booths and job seekers walk around and talk to various employers, a reverse job fair has job seekers setting up booths, and employers walking around and talking to perspective job candidates. This process allows job seekers with disabilities to sell themselves through a presentation and visual resume, putting them in a position of control. Visual resumes are important components for job seekers with disabilities to present their strengths and talents during the reverse job fair. Creating visual resumes captures a job seeker's passions, interests and desires related to their employment goals - significantly increasing their chances for employment. Creating visual resumes also engages the individual in the job seeking process in a fun and productive way. This presenter will discuss the process planning and implementing a reverse job fairs from preparing job seekers to inviting the business community, and strategies to create visual resumes that enhance competitive integrated employment outcomes for job seekers with disabilities.

    Presenters
    avatar for Laura Owens

    Laura Owens

    President, TransCen Inc.
    Laura A. Owens, Ph.D., CESP, has over 30 years of experience as a national leader in the transition and disability employment field. She is currently a Professor in the Department of Teaching and Learning at the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee (UWM) and the President of TransCen... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 10:55am - 11:45am
    Meeting Room: Coyote 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    10:55am

    Self-Determination and Autonomy Post-Olmstead: Making Good on the Promise
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Two decades after the Olmstead decision, people with disabilities continue to be seen as incompetent and in need of constant oversight and protection. This, even within the promise and implementation of Olmstead, results in people being segregated, congregated and controlled, deeply embedded in the role of "human service recipient." In this role, people are denied basic human rights and stripped of their autonomy. This session will explore the impact on people's lives when others are making decisions about them and for them, as well as possible remedies. The personal autonomy, liberty, freedom, and dignity of people with disabilities must be respected and supported. We will also discuss the path moving forward towards full, meaningful inclusive lives where people with disabilities express their autonomy and are recognized as fully contributing citizens.

    Presenters
    avatar for Leslie Lipson

    Leslie Lipson

    Attorney, Lipson Advocacy: Educational, Legal and Strategy Specialist
    Talk to me about advocacy solutions using general educational and special education law, from a values-based foundation and mindset of presuming competence. My practice supports both attorneys and non-attorney advocates to succeed in school-based advocacy. Talk to me about grassroots... Read More →
    avatar for Katie Chandler

    Katie Chandler

    Project Consultant, Sangha Unity Network
    Katie is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker who works with Sangha Unity Network as a Project Consultant. Throughout her career, she has worked as a direct support professional, advocate, clinical supervisor, facilitator and consultant. Previously she directed the Developmental Disability... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 10:55am - 11:45am
    Meeting Room: Roadrunner 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    10:55am

    Teaching Core Academic Content to Students with Intellectual Disabilities Using Technology
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Our presentation focuses on a literature review of single-case studies published between 2012 and 2019. Studies focus specifically on teaching students with intellectual disabilities using instructional and/or assistive technologies across the four-core content academic disciplines: mathematics, science, social sciences, and language arts. Our research allows practitioners to identify evidence-based strategies that support the inclusion of diverse students with intellectual disabilities learning academic content.

    Presenters
    avatar for Allison Kroesch

    Allison Kroesch

    Assistant Professor, Illinois State University


    Friday December 6, 2019 10:55am - 11:45am
    Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 3 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    10:55am

    Training Paraprofessionals to Implement FCT with AAC Users with Autism
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Because breakdowns in communication can often contribute to challenging behavior, students with autism who utilize augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) are at greater risk for engaging in challenging behavior resulting from characteristics related to their communication needs. An additional challenge exists when paraprofessionals are not adequately prepared to address the communication and behavioral needs of students with autism who use AAC. The presentation will present initial findings on a study evaluating the effectiveness of training paraprofessionals to implement functional communication training to address challenging behaviors of students with autism who utilize AAC.

    Presenters
    avatar for Kristin Lyon

    Kristin Lyon

    Research Associate, University of Kansas
    avatar for Virginia Walker

    Virginia Walker

    Assistant Professor, Department of Special Education and Child Development, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
    Virginia L. Walker, PhD, BCBA-D, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Special Education and Child Development at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Dr. Walker began her career as a special education teacher of students with extensive support needs in Atlanta... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 10:55am - 11:45am
    Meeting Room: Eagle 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    10:55am

    What Does Endrew F.'s Potential for Growth Mean?
    Limited Capacity seats available

    In Endrew F., the Supreme Court states that an IEP must be based on an individualized evaluation of the child's "potential for growth." School districts must consider the child's potential for growth, not just her present levels. In other words, a purposeful assessment in all areas of suspected disability with an eye toward assessing for ability. After all, why do an educational assessment for any reason if not for figuring out how to best educate the child? Nonetheless, school districts rely on IQ tests to measure cognitive potential. IQ tests only measure present levels. What exactly does evaluating potential mean? Is potential a fixed element? Is there any study that parents can rely upon to argue that potential is not fixed for life? We will look at dynamic assessments as an alternative to assessing a student with language delays and intellectual disabilities.

    Presenters
    avatar for Barbara Ransom

    Barbara Ransom

    A civil rights attorney who represents individuals, families and organizations seeking relief from discrimination on the basis of disability.


    Friday December 6, 2019 10:55am - 11:45am
    Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 1 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    1:04pm

    About Breakout Sessions
    Breakout Presentations are delivered in assigned meeting rooms for 50 minutes.

    Friday December 6, 2019 1:04pm - 1:05pm
    Sheraton Grand at Wild Horse Pass 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    1:05pm

    Diversifying Our Voices: Transforming Communities through Stories of Inclusion, Support & Empowerment
    Limited Capacity seats available

    For people with diverse abilities, the opportunity to be included in the community requires more than just self-determination; it requires supports that are customized to individual needs, accessible where and when needed, and delivered by a qualified workforce. Inclusive communities require a deeper understanding of what it truly takes for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities to be supported and empowered to live the lives that they choose. But all too often, the path to this deeper understanding is blocked because individuals and the professionals who support them remain invisible. Absent a more vocal articulation of the contributions they make to our communities and our society, individuals with I/DD and the support providers who are integral to success will remain in the shadows. Recognizing the urgency of this challenge, the ANCOR Foundation launched Included. Supported. Empowered. to celebrate the successes of individuals with I/DD and bring awareness to the important role of long-term supports and services in making it possible for individuals to be included and valued in the community. Envisioned as a three-year public awareness-raising initiative, Included. Supported. Empowered. is disseminating data and best practices, equipping advocates with tools and resources, and leveraging earned and digital media to amplify voices that reinforce our shared message: that we all have a stake in building more inclusive communities. In this session, presenters will walk through the ways in which individuals with I/DD and the I/DD support workforce have been relegated to the shadows, ultimately making the case for why telling our stories and sharing our experiences should be seen as an essential part of our work. Then, presenters will equip participants with field-tested strategies for telling stories and garnering attention for the work we do as a disability community. Participants in this hands-on, how-to session will walk away with a clear sense of why sharing personal perspectives is critical, as well as with concrete tools that make it easy to craft, share and amplify stories that can help make the case for more diverse and inclusive communities.

    Presenters
    avatar for Sean Luechtefeld

    Sean Luechtefeld

    Communications Director, ANCOR
    Check out my session on the why and how of telling your personal story as a disability advocate. Stop by the Included. Supported. Empowered. Story Room on Saturday to go on camera and show the world why supporting people of all abilities is essential. And, visit the ANCOR booth in... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 1:05pm - 1:55pm
    Meeting Room: Roadrunner 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    1:05pm

    Lessons Learned from International Development Efforts to Promote Inclusion
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Developing countries generally lack adequate material and human resources to support the needs of children with disabilities. As a result, children with disabilities' human and civil rights for equity, opportunity, and inclusion are ignored or abridged. They could be excluded from society as well as from support and service systems (including education) that could meet their needs and develop their potential. This presentation will summarize lessons learned from my extensive International Development work in the field of disabilities. It will present recommended approaches and strategies to mobilize self-advocates, parent organizations, Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), community leaders, government officials, professionals, and the general public to advocate and to capacity-build for inclusion. It will also identify factors that could facilitate or interfere with advocacy and capacity- building for inclusion. Field examples will be provided to illustrate the above. Adequate time will be allocated for questions and discussion.

    Presenters

    Friday December 6, 2019 1:05pm - 1:55pm
    Meeting Room: Horse 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    1:05pm

    Outcomes of Inclusive Education for Students with Significant Disabilities
    Limited Capacity seats available

    During this session, we will present a review of existing literature on inclusive education; specifically, we will present the findings of our systematic literature review focused on identifying outcomes of inclusive education for students with severe disabilities in the following domains: academic skills, behavior skills, social skills, and communication skills. This presentation aligns with this year's conference theme because we will present a broad range of experiences of students with significant disabilities documented in existing literature on inclusive education. By reviewing the existing research, we will have also considered and analyzed various approaches to supporting students with significant disabilities in inclusive classroom settings.

    Presenters
    avatar for Jennifer Kurth

    Jennifer Kurth

    Associate Professor, University of Kansas
    Inclusive Education
    avatar for Alison Zagona

    Alison Zagona

    Assistant Professor, University of New Mexico
    I am an Assistant Professor at the University of New Mexico, and I am the co-Chair of the TASH Early Career Researcher Network. My research is focused on inclusive education and instructional, social, and behavior supports for students with complex support needs. I am also passionate... Read More →
    avatar for Kristin Burnette

    Kristin Burnette

    Doctoral Student, UNCG


    Friday December 6, 2019 1:05pm - 1:55pm
    Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 3 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    1:05pm

    Peer-Mediated Interventions for Adolescents with ASD: What Teachers Should Know
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Peer-mediated intervention (PMI), an identified evidence based practice for students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD; Wong et al., 2015), has been shown to promote a range of positive social outcomes for these students in inclusive educational settings. However, much of the research contributing to the evidence has been conducted with younger populations at the preschool through middle school grade levels. In high school, the demand for good social-communication skills increases, and left unaddressed, common social skill difficulties experienced by high school students with ASD can result in social isolation and peer rejection. Fortunately, new emerging research documents that PMI can also be successfully applied in high school settings to promote improved social-communication skills of adolescents with ASD while interacting with their peers. Given the relative recency of high school PMI research for adolescents with ASD, there is much work to be done. This includes not only additional research for the continued development of effective, practical interventions, but also helping secondary teachers understand how to select and effectively implement PMIs in their schools. Teachers will need to become familiar with the various types of PMI approaches and their expected outcomes, know how to select and individualize PMIs to address learner needs, and how to address the numerous logistical challenges of implementing PMIs in high school settings. This session will review the research literature on PMI for improving social-communication outcomes of high school students with ASD. Given the range of PMIs, the purpose of this session is help teachers identify what interventions are effective for whom, for achieving what outcomes or skills, and in what social contexts. Specifically, the goals of this review are to a) identify the characteristics of students with ASD involved in PMI research, b) identify and describe the various approaches and components of PMI used to improve social-communication interactions with peers, including peer and focus student (with ASD) training or instruction, c) describe the findings or outcomes of the interventions and e) identify strategies and settings for implementation within typical school activities. In addition to reporting what is known about effective use of PMIs, a secondary purpose of this review is to identify gaps and challenges to implementing PMI and make recommendations for practice and future research. Guidelines and considerations for matching PMI approaches to specific learner goals gleaned from research will be provided.

    Presenters

    Friday December 6, 2019 1:05pm - 1:55pm
    Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 1 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    1:05pm

    Positive Behavior Support Training of DSPs in a Self-Directed Supports Model
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Self-Directed Supports (SDS) are a service delivery model for individuals and families who wish to exercise more choice, control and authority over their supports (Home & Community-Based Services 1915(c). SDS is founded on the principles of self-determination. With SDS, the person with the disability or their designated representative (typically a family member) has employment authority. Employment authority allows for the recruiting, hiring, training, managing, supervising, scheduling and terminating employees. Typically, personal assistants (PAs) or Direct Support Professionals (DSPs) are hired to provide physical, medical and/or behavioral supports. The person with the disability or their designated representative is expected to provide the training needed to support the individual. They may be assisted by a community specialist or a behavior therapist. Preparation for training staff begins with a detailed job description and a listing of skills needed to meet those job responsibilities. Typically, a support manual is developed that describes supports needed for activities of daily living, communication, vocational, recreational, and community supports. If an individual exhibits challenging behavior, positive behavior support may be need in some or all of these areas. Training focuses both on the proactive principles of positive behavior support and the addressing of individual needs. This may be done through online modules, a review of the person's individualized support plan, shadowing an experienced support staff or family member, viewing videos of successfully resolved situations of challenging behavior and intermittent coaching. Successful training is ongoing and includes allowing Direct Support Professionals to debrief when challenging behavior has occurred. It is also collaborative. As Direct Support Professionals become more skilled and spend more time with the person they are supporting, they have insights into ways to prevent challenging behaviors from occurring, to teach new skills that meet the person's needs and how to intervene when challenging behavior does occur. Regular team meetings allow for these insights to be shared among support staff and other members of the person's support network. The number of individuals and families choosing self-direction has increased tremendously over the past twenty years as self-directed services have become as providing persons with disability with greater choice, control, and self-determination (Dicarlo, 2016). Participants report receiving unique supports that improve quality of life outcomes (Foster, Brown, Phillips & Carlson, 2005). The most significant finding repeatedly reported has been the increased satisfaction that accompanies participation in self-direction (Matthias & Benjamin, 2008; Gross, Blue-Banning, Turnbull & Francis (2015). As use of this model continues to grow, APBS should turn its attention to offering individuals and families assistance in providing high-quality training for DSPs. Participants will receive a template for creating an individualized support manual, evaluate a number of training formats and develop an outline for a successful team meeting.

    Presenters
    avatar for Victoria McMullen

    Victoria McMullen

    Professor, Webster University
    Dr. McMullen is a Professor in the Department of Teacher Education at Webster University. She teaches undergraduate courses on language development and behavior management, as well as graduate courses concerning the education of individuals with significant developmental disabilities... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 1:05pm - 1:55pm
    Meeting Room: Eagle 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    1:05pm

    Privilege & the Intersectionality of Race and Disability in Special Education
    Limited Capacity seats available

    "Education is perhaps the most important function of state and local governments" (Brown v. Board of Education, 1954). Thus, Brown made legal history when the Court banned separate but equal from public education. But, did it? Special Education is the last bastion where separate but equal is still legal. The presenters rely on the historical framework of segregation to examine the use of special education classifications to keep segregated schools alive. Data show that it is impossible to ignore the roots of segregation in the special education system. Presenters will discuss strategies that challenge educators to examine their own privilege as they make decisions that impact racial disproportionality in special education. Participants will explore the blindness created by privilege as they explore additional strategies that self-advocates, advocates and parents can use to challenge the status quo that allows this disproportionality to exist.

    Presenters
    avatar for Barbara Ransom

    Barbara Ransom

    A civil rights attorney who represents individuals, families and organizations seeking relief from discrimination on the basis of disability.


    Friday December 6, 2019 1:05pm - 1:55pm
    Meeting Room: Scorpion 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    1:05pm

    School-Wide Transformation to Include ALL Learners
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Definitions for “inclusive education” are confounded by notions that place (location of instruction) determines when a student is included. In this session, the presenter will share a framework for an inclusive school, ranging from school-wide practices to classroom applications, to individual student planning where all students have access to all physical environments within a school building. The meaning of “inclusion” for individual learners is then defined in terms of the extent to which all learners are valued members, participate in all school activities equitably, and have access to and make progress in academic and functional skills. National placement data over 20 years will show the extent to which students physically access general education settings in each State. Participants will review and provide input into a classroom rating of membership and participation, based on video observations of learners engaged in instruction within general education classes.

    Presenters
    avatar for Carol Quirk

    Carol Quirk

    Executive Director, Maryland Coalition for Inclusive Education


    Friday December 6, 2019 1:05pm - 1:55pm
    Meeting Room: Gila-Monster 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    1:05pm

    Strengthening Self-Advocacy: Peer Supports in a Formal Complaint System
    Limited Capacity seats available

    The peer supporter plays a role in informing the service delivery system and making recommendations for changes to the system. Through the formal complaint system, DC DDS also tracks and trends data to inform systems change. Annually, the peer supporters write a report highlighting their work and recommendations for systems change that is needed to help improve the lives of people supported by DDS.

    Presenters
    avatar for Lee Anne Brantley

    Lee Anne Brantley

    Complaint System Coordinator, DC Department on Disability Services


    Friday December 6, 2019 1:05pm - 1:55pm
    Meeting Room: Quail 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    1:05pm

    Survivors of Institutions: Life Story Lessons of a Remembered Community
    Limited Capacity seats available

    In all diverse communities, an elder population exists eager to tell its stories. Memories were videotaped of ten individuals speaking freely from community homes as they describe survival at a state institution. Twenty additional stories were derived from review of archival records. These stories continue to inform inclusive communities today.

    Presenters

    Friday December 6, 2019 1:05pm - 1:55pm
    Meeting Room: Ant 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    1:05pm

    The Impacts of Parent to Parent Support in Early Childhood for Parents, Families and Children: A Qualitative Interview Study
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Parent to Parent (P2P) is a peer support program that trains parents of children with disabilities to provide informational and emotional support to other parents who are seeking support through a one-to-one match. The benefits of a Parent to Parent match include not only meeting the specific need that originally prompted their contact with Parent to Parent, but improved their perception of their ability to cope with their child and family situation, and imparted a more positive appraisal of their life circumstances. What is unknown is whether these benefits are experienced by parents of very young children, when a diagnosis may be new and successful interventions and services may not yet be established. Additionally, it is unclear whether P2P support provides benefits that extend to the child and other members of the family. Qualitative thematic data derived from interviews with parents who received a P2P match will be presented to explicate the perceived benefits of early P2P support, along with participant quotes. Implications for policy and practice will be discussed as well as future directions.

    Presenters
    avatar for Robin Dodds

    Robin Dodds

    Assistant Professor of Early Childhood Special Education, California State University Los Angeles


    Friday December 6, 2019 1:05pm - 1:55pm
    Meeting Room: Deer 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    1:05pm

    The Role of Parental Expectations on Employment and Career Development: Results from a Pilot Study
    Limited Capacity seats available

    The family is a place in which children learn to interpret reality and parents serve as role models to inform children about the world - including the world of work. One consistent finding in the literature suggests that the aspirations of young adults are influenced by their parents' aspirations or expectations for them (Banks, Maitre and McCoy, 2016). By nature, parents want their children to be successful and hope to see them in satisfying careers one day. The thought of seeing their adult child in dead-end jobs is often disheartening for parents of young adults with disabilities. This presentation will discuss the findings from a pilot study consisting of focus groups of parents of young adults with disabilities who were transitioning from school to work and parents of young adults who had already transitioned into the world of work.

    Presenters
    avatar for Laura Owens

    Laura Owens

    President, TransCen Inc.
    Laura A. Owens, Ph.D., CESP, has over 30 years of experience as a national leader in the transition and disability employment field. She is currently a Professor in the Department of Teaching and Learning at the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee (UWM) and the President of TransCen... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 1:05pm - 1:55pm
    Meeting Room: Buzzard 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    1:05pm

    The Role of Self-Advocacy in the Fight for Communication Choice
    Limited Capacity seats available

    In this session, attendees will receive a first-hand account from seasoned self-advocate and communication rights activist Tracy Thresher on his role in getting Facilitated Communication Training officially recognized as a fundable service in the state of Vermont. Through adversity, controversy, and push-back from top officials Tracy used his typing voice to educate and advocate for his right to communicate using his method of choice. From Tracy's presentation: "In the spring of 2015, the Vermont Department of Disabilities, Aging, and Independent Living (DAIL) began the process of examining how funds were used to pay for a variety of developmental services, including Facilitated Communication Training. I was invited to join a Developmental Disabilities Clinical Services Task Force as a self-advocate who types to communicate. With the doubt and continued controversy faced by typing individuals around the globe it is encouraging that in Vermont my typing is seen as valuable input and a valid method of accessing true communication. Thinking that I could move the hearts and minds of the big time decision makers with my typing strengthens my resolve to keep using my voice to spread my message of presumed competence and communication choice."

    Presenters
    avatar for Tracy Thresher

    Tracy Thresher

    Mentor and Communication Consultant, Washington County Mental Health
    Tracy Thresher is a native Vermonter who lives and works in Vermont. Tracy began using Facilitated Communication in 1990 and was one of the first individuals with autism in Vermont to be introduced to the method. He has presented at local, statewide and national workshops and conferences... Read More →
    avatar for Harvey Lavoy

    Harvey Lavoy

    Director Communication & Training & Resources, Community Developmental Services


    Friday December 6, 2019 1:05pm - 1:55pm
    Meeting Room: Bird 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    1:05pm

    WIOA and One Stop Career Centers: Preparing Individuals with Disabilities for High Demand Careers
    Limited Capacity seats available

    With the implementation of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) regulations, the use of Title I funding to provide high demand career opportunities for individuals with disabilities is on the rise. Title I funding can pay for training opportunities leading to certification in high demand career jobs and on the job training. One-Stop Career Centers are undergoing agency transformation by employing Disability Employment Specialists who provide access to resources such as career mapping and exploration, integrated resource teams, assistive technology, ticket to work and social security benefits analysis to individuals with disabilities. Partnerships with Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and local employers are also increasing employment opportunities in high demand job/career areas such as truck driving, medical, information systems technology, and film.

    Presenters
    avatar for Stacey Anderson

    Stacey Anderson

    Disability Employment Specialist, Atlanta Regional Commission
    I am the Disability Employment Specialist for the Atlanta Regional Commission. I am also a 2nd year doctoral candidate at Indiana Wesleyan University. I have many years of disability employment experience and currently I am responsible for reframing and refining the delivery of services... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 1:05pm - 1:55pm
    Meeting Room: Coyote 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    1:05pm

    An Inclusive Life Starts with an Inclusive Education: Views from School Administrators
    Limited Capacity seats available

    This is a Two Part Presentation. This presentation aligns with the 2019 theme, Building Diverse and Inclusive Communities, by sharing the leadership and determination that school systems have demonstrated in order to pave the way for all people to have an inclusive life. The presenters will share their views for how school districts and individual schools in Illinois are building diverse and inclusive communities to improve outcomes of students and their non-disabled peers. Presenters will describe their change processes, and how their districts and schools are evolving to develop relationships and networks to create a unified educational system based upon inclusive values. Part One of the presentation will address the following: The work of Theoharis and Causton-Theoharis (2008, 2014) outlines a theory of how to create a vision for inclusive education and the related action steps. Through regional and individual district case examples shared, the alignment to such research will be highlighted: 1) How a regional agency engaged their school districts in a strategic planning process to align to a future of inclusive services, 2) How individual school districts are systemically focusing on raising achievement for all, by building capacity and breaking down barriers to access for students with the complex needs 3) How individual schools are improving their service delivery models to ensure all students' needs are met in inclusive settings, and 4) How school districts are analyzing their disability data, identifying hypotheses for gaps in performance, while proposing solutions to address barriers in the era of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). Part Two will be a continuation of the content.

    Presenters
    avatar for Kurt Schneider

    Kurt Schneider

    Superintendent, NSSED
    Dr. Kurt A. Schneider is currently the Superintendent of the Northern Suburban Special Education District in Highland Park, Illinois, a metropolitan suburban district of Chicago that provides special education, related services, and other supports to 18 member districts. Previously... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 1:05pm - 3:00pm
    Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 2 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    2:10pm

    Changing the Narrative on Support Relationships: It's Not Just 9-to-5
    Limited Capacity seats available

    We all look to others for various supports in each area of our life. With so much of our time spent at work, the relationships we have with our colleagues are significant. Working in tandem, collaborating, and traveling together often leads to the shifting of these relationships — paving the way for reliability, trust, and camaraderie. This is especially important in work relationships between people with disabilities and their nondisabled peers. EVERYONE benefits where there are mutual affection and supports! The presenters will share their stories of coming together in the workplace, and how those relationships led to ones of flourishing and friendship.

    Presenters
    avatar for Bud Buckhout

    Bud Buckhout

    Director of InclusiveU, Taishoff Center for Inclusive Higher Higher Education
    Stanley or better known as “Bud” Buckhout has worked in education for over 20 years. He earned is Teaching Certificate, Masters in Special Education and A Certificate of Advanced Study from Le Moyne College. He has worked in exploring research and facilitation of groups to aid... Read More →
    avatar for Tia Nelis

    Tia Nelis

    Director of Policy & Advocacy, TASH
    Tia Nelis is the Director of Policy & Advocacy for TASH. She comes to TASH after serving as Self-Advocacy Specialist at the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center within the Institute on Disability and Human Development at University of Illinois at Chicago. She also is one of... Read More →
    avatar for Raquel Rosa

    Raquel Rosa

    Representative Payee Project Analyst, National Disability Rights Network
    Raquel is the eldest sibling of a young man who has cerebral palsy. Her career as an advocate for disability justice began 17 years ago, providing direct supports to adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. In 2010, she co-founded DC Metro Sibs, the Washington, DC-based... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 2:10pm - 3:00pm
    Meeting Room: Roadrunner 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    2:10pm

    Developing High-Quality Teachers for Inclusive Settings
    Limited Capacity seats available

    This presentation explores revisions of a special education and an APE program through the work of a US DOE personnel development 325K grant to support students with high- intensity needs in diverse and inclusive settings. Faculty will share data outlining the success of embedding CEC High-Leverage Practices into courses.

    Presenters
    avatar for Beth Foster

    Beth Foster

    Assistant Professor in Adapted Physical Education, Cal Poly Pomona University
    Follow @CPPAdaptedPE


    Friday December 6, 2019 2:10pm - 3:00pm
    Meeting Room: Rattlesnake 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    2:10pm

    Development and Evaluation of the Teacher Rater and Assessment Instrument for Teachers of Students with Significant Disabilities (TRAIT-SD)
    Limited Capacity seats available

    The purpose of this work was to develop and evaluate the Teacher Rating and Assessment Instrument for Teachers of Students with Significant Disability (TRAIT-SD). The TRAIT-SD is an evaluation instrument for teachers of students with significant disabilities based on best practices in the field of special education. This instrument is implemented with individual teachers through the use of direct observation, interviewing, and review of documents. The TRAIT-SD is intended to measure the quality of instruction provided by a specific teacher to one or more students with severe disabilities. Students with severe disabilities include those with moderate to severe intellectual disabilities, multiple disabilities, and some students on the autism spectrum. There is little consensus among researchers or practitioners on the best method for evaluating special education teachers who educate students with severe disabilities ( Jones & Brownell, 2014; Westling, Salzberg, Collins, Morgan, & Knight 2013). In addition, there are no teacher evaluation tools for students with severe disabilities that have been evaluated for reliability and validity (Westling et al., 2013). This study may provide practitioners with the psychometric features of this instrument and potentially assist them in selecting a tool to evaluate and support teachers of students with severe disability. This tool may also support administrators and teachers to include students wtih severe disabilities in general education.

    Presenters
    avatar for Karena Duffy-Cooper

    Karena Duffy-Cooper

    Profession in Special Education, Western Carolina University


    Friday December 6, 2019 2:10pm - 3:00pm
    Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 3 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    2:10pm

    Early Intervention Access in a Diverse, Economically Disadvantaged, Urban Area
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Research shows that early intervention (EI) and preschool special education services (from birth -5) (here referred to as ECSE) have a positive impact on children's progress as well as on empowering parents to advocate for their children. However, accessing ECSE services can be complicated by the need for collaborations between the many stakeholders involved in the referral and service provision process. Parents and guardians, medical clinicians, childcare providers and preschool teachers from one large, racially, culturally and economically diverse urban area were interviewed to understand the process of referral to and service delivery from ECSE. The perspectives of multiple stakeholders highlights the challenges of communicating concerns about development, ensuring that that the referral is made, accessing specialists, and closing the communication loop for parents, child care providers, physicians and special education service providers once services start. Suggestions on how to address these challenges and ensure that young children with disabilities and their families from a broad range of racial, cultural and economic groups are able to fully access the resources available to them.


    Friday December 6, 2019 2:10pm - 3:00pm
    Meeting Room: Scorpion 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    2:10pm

    Educational Experiences and Practices Grounded in Neurodiversity and Multimodal Communication
    Limited Capacity seats available

    This presentation will discuss findings from a qualitative research study that explores the experiences of students and those who support them in a school grounded in the neurodiversity paradigm (Walker, 2014), with a focus on multimodal communication access. Sensory, motor, and learning differences can create barriers to communication, academic performance and social opportunities (Donnellan, Hill & Leary, 2013; Hussman et al. 2011; Torres et al. 2013). Yet there remains much unexplored about educational strategies and supports in school settings that can effectively reduce those barriers from a strengths-based perspective; even less that draws upon experiences and leadership of neurodivergent people themselves. For example, it has been established that individuals with disabilities, such as autism, involving complex sensory, motor and communication needs benefit from a range of Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) tools for supporting communication (Kagohara et al., 2013; Light & McNaughton, 2012). Yet less is known about incorporating AAC in grade level curriculum, what other concurrent supports are helpful to reduce barriers associated with sensory, movement and learning differences, or what it means to be a neurodivergent student. As this year's conference theme, Building Diverse and Inclusive Communities, reminds us, equity, opportunity, and inclusion rely on the contributions of broad perspectives and experiences. As such, this study explores the integral ways that the leadership and collaboration across neurodiverse experiences, particularly with self-advocates who utilize AAC or a range of communicative modalities, play into all experiences at school. This work is rooted in TASH's mission of centering and learning alongside those most at risk for being excluded, empowering self-advocates drive both research and practice that impacts them. This research will document practices, experiences and relationships that contribute to learning experiences for/with/across neurodiversity, while also supporting development of students' skills and identities as multimodal communicators. The presentation will translate findings into concrete strategies for practice, informed by experiences and promising practices of students and self-advocates with sensory, motor and learning differences, as well as those who support them at school from a strengths-based perspective that explicitly values neurodiverse ways of being and communicating.

    Presenters
    avatar for Molly K. Rearick

    Molly K. Rearick

    Founder & Executive Director, IGNITE Collective, Inc.


    Friday December 6, 2019 2:10pm - 3:00pm
    Meeting Room: Bird 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    2:10pm

    Educators as Activists: Preparing Special Educators to be Agents of Change
    Limited Capacity seats available

    New teachers often learn about evidence-based practices as well as principles of equity and access in their university training, but may have difficulty implementing these principles in their role as a new teacher of a self-contained special education classroom. Through a university-district partnership in Los Angeles, CA, university faculty, district staff, school partners, and credential candidates collaborate to increase both the quantity and quality of time that students with disabilities spend in general education. This partnership facilitates the active engagement of credential candidates and graduates in the process of school change towards inclusive practices, and builds a network of support among candidates and their mentors. This collaboration has resulted in new special education teachers who are actively engaged in school change efforts at their school sites, and who are acting as leaders for inclusive practices, even in their early years as a teacher. In this session, our university-district team will share the systems that have led to partnerships for creating and sustaining inclusive practices. Several newly credentialed teachers will share a) elements of their credential program that helped them to bridge what they learned in classes to their work as teachers, b) the roles they are playing at their school sites to make them more inclusive, and c) the impact they have seen for students and families at their sites.

    Presenters
    avatar for Amy Hanreddy

    Amy Hanreddy

    Associate Professor, Special Education, California State University, Northridge


    Friday December 6, 2019 2:10pm - 3:00pm
    Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 1 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    2:10pm

    Empowering Families to Participate In and Facilitate Career Development
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Many families of youth with significant disabilities struggle with envisioning their young person working in competitive employment in a community setting. Educators and other professionals have an important role to play in proactively supporting the family's ability to be meaningfully engaged and effectively advocating for their young person to reach their potential as self-determined adults who work and live full and inclusive lives in the community. This session, presented from the parent point of view, will increase both parents' and professionals' understanding of the factors influencing a family's willingness and ability to actively participate in inclusive career development activities. It will provide examples of tested strategies for inviting and engaging families of teens and young adults with significant disabilities, including those from diverse cultures. Participants will discuss ways to effectively implement strategies in light of family concerns as well as current realities and resources.

    Presenters

    Friday December 6, 2019 2:10pm - 3:00pm
    Meeting Room: Coyote 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    2:10pm

    Factors that Exacerbate the Continued Segregation of Students with Disabilities
    Limited Capacity seats available

    In 2018, the Council of Parent Attorneys and Advocates, Inc. (COPAA), under a cooperative agreement with the National Council on Disability (NCD), researched and wrote the report “The Segregation of Students with Disabilities.” This report is part of a five-report series on the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) that describes the legal and scientific basis for an inclusive versus segregated education, summarizes national patterns for educating students with disabilities in general education classes, examines federal and state guidance, and state compliance with federal mandates, describes effective educational practices for reducing segregation, and provides findings and recommendations for improvement. COPAA asserts that we must look at the entire system in order to truly improve results for children. The panoply of laws that promote equity and prohibit discrimination, and the provisions of the IDEA must be faithfully implemented in concert to ensure that the civil and constitutional rights of children with disabilities. The presenters will discuss specific trends and recommendations with the audience and dialogue about solutions to factors that sustain segregation.


    Friday December 6, 2019 2:10pm - 3:00pm
    Meeting Room: Gila-Monster 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    2:10pm

    Learning to Live & Give after Trauma...the Importance of Acknowledgement, Control, Movement and Giving Back!
    Limited Capacity seats available

    It seems every day we are coming to realize the amount of trauma surrounding us... and the many of us who have experienced it in physical, emotional, medical, and situational forms. Many types of therapies are now available for this but most focus on "healing", which is a long shot for far too many of us. Through an innovative combination of education, deciding their pathway of tools to use, wholistic bodywork (reiki, reflexology, massage, etc.), physical movement (yoga, dance, etc.), person centered planning, and finding ways to give back to others we are helping people move on with their lives and re-define themselves.

    Presenters
    avatar for Rosa McAllister

    Rosa McAllister

    Co-founder and Organizational Advisor, Networks for Training and Development, Inc.
    Aloha! While my organization (Networks) is located in the Phila., PA area our reach is way farther.... in fact, I live & work in Maui, HI. Throughout my career I have been involved in positive behavioral supports, person centered planning, non-profit leadership / organizational design... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 2:10pm - 3:00pm
    Meeting Room: Eagle 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    2:10pm

    Legislative Advocacy 101: Getting Everyone Involved
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Avenues SLS has conducted over 25 legislative visits annually over the past few years, locally, at our State Capital and as part of our Cal-TASH Conference, with each and every visit including a family member and/or a person we support. It is essential that our legislators and their staff meet and hear the stories of the people we support in order for them to understand the importance of quality, person-centered services that are inclusive. It is equally essential that people who don't communicate well, or who don't communicate traditionally have ways to share their stories, through technology, ppts or slide shows so that their stories can be heard.

    Presenters
    avatar for Scott Shepard

    Scott Shepard

    Director, Avenues Supported Living Services
    Scott Shepard is the Executive Director of Avenues Supported Living Services, a non-profit agency which provides community living and personalized day supports to adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities in North Los Angeles County. With Avenues SLS, we had the opportunity... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 2:10pm - 3:00pm
    Meeting Room: Ant 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    2:10pm

    Making Supported Decision-Making a Priority Support in Youth Transition
    Limited Capacity seats available

    The issue of decision-making skill and authority is something that should be focused on early in the special education process and be an essential part of support during the transition years. This session will provide a detailed description of how families and educators can use the principles of supported decision-making from the beginning of the transition planning process to design tools. The presenters will share specific strategies and tools that enable youth to contribute to decision-making in meaningful ways, as well as build skills for improved decision-making after age 18. Strategies presented will discuss factors to consider under federal and varying state laws, as students assume increasing responsibility for educational decision-making. Case examples from DC will be used to illustrate how to individualize these tools to meet specific student needs and include videos from students expressing their personal experience with Supported Decision-Making.

    Presenters
    avatar for Morgan Whitlatch

    Morgan Whitlatch

    Legal Director, Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities
    Morgan K. Whitlatch is the Legal Director of the Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities, an independent, non-profit advocacy organization that has been advancing the interests of D.C. residents with developmental disabilities since 2002. Morgan has devoted her legal career... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 2:10pm - 3:00pm
    Meeting Room: Quail 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    2:10pm

    Training Peer Mentors: Implementation and Student Behavior in Postsecondary Education
    Limited Capacity seats available

    With more options to go to college (https://thinkcollege.net/), young adults with autism an intellectual disability (ASD-ID) have more opportunities to develop skills in adaptive behavior, communication, and social interactions that may not have often occurred in segregated K-12 environments. Inclusive postsecondary educational settings provide meaningful opportunities for young adults with ASD-ID to develop skills, with dignity, supported by college students serving as peer mentors. However, it is unknown if and how peer mentors can support skill development of students with ASD-ID in higher education. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of training and coaching on (a) peer mentor's implementation fidelity of individualized behavior plans, and (b) the behavior of students with ASD-ID. To answer these questions, a single subject multiple baseline design across three peer mentor-student pairs was used. During this session participants will learn successful peer mentor training and coaching strategies. Further, learn how much training and coaching was needed for peer mentors to successfully implement student behavior plans as intended and the impact on student behavior. Suggestions for future research and training in alternative environments (e.g., inclusive K-12 settings) will be discussed. This information can be used to advance the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in postsecondary education and potentially in their future work and recreation.

    Presenters
    avatar for Stephanie MacFarland

    Stephanie MacFarland

    University of Arizona
    avatar for Kirsten Lansey

    Kirsten Lansey

    Doctoral Student, University of Arizona


    Friday December 6, 2019 2:10pm - 3:00pm
    Meeting Room: Buzzard 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    2:10pm

    What Can We Safely Presume? A Discussion on Instructing Students with Complex Communication Needs
    Limited Capacity seats available

    This discussion will outline a practitioner's guidelines for addressing communicative competence for augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) users with complex communication needs. Participants will examine the current literature and discuss ideas for practice guidelines outlining when presumptions of competence can still protect all individuals from exposure to interventions with high levels of risk for abuse, when only the potential for competence should be presumed, and when to demand evidence.

    Presenters

    Friday December 6, 2019 2:10pm - 3:00pm
    Meeting Room: Horse 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    3:20pm

    A Comprehensive Evaluation of Perspectives Regarding a Post-Secondary Education Program
    Limited Capacity seats available

    This qualitative study sought detailed insights into individual experiences with a university post-secondary program for students with intellectual disabilities, ages 18-22. Past and present students and parents, as well as peer education coaches and mentors, program staff, and participating professors were interviewed about their first-hand experiences. This collective gathering of multiple parties involved in the post-secondary program is unique from previous studies that focus on specific groups such as students or peer education mentors. The comprehensive nature of this qualitative study provides a unique opportunity for the development or improvement of guidelines that represent perspectives of all key parties of post-secondary education programs. Our presentation aligns with the conference theme of diverse and inclusive communities because the program targeted by our study fosters diverse student perspectives at the university. Our presentation will inform transition age-individuals with ID and their families of all backgrounds, including diverse groups, about the offerings of post-secondary education programs and outcomes upon graduation from the program. This presentation also addresses the needs of a group who have historically been marginalized in terms of attending college (i.e., those with ID).

    Presenters
    AF

    Andrea Forsyth

    Doctoral Student, University of Nevada, Reno
    JP

    Jodee Prudente

    Teacher/Leader/Student, WCSD/UNR
    I am a veteran special education teacher. I have primarily worked with students wit intellectual disabilities grades K-8. I have a Bachelors degree in Elementary and Special Education and a Masters in Special Education with a focus on students with intellectual and multiple disabilities... Read More →
    BG

    Brianna Grumstrup

    Doctoral Student, University of Nevada, Reno


    Friday December 6, 2019 3:20pm - 4:10pm
    Meeting Room: Rattlesnake 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    3:20pm

    Adult Attachment Style in Romantic Relationships for Adults with ID: A Framework
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Attachment theory, first studied in the context of the infant-primary caregiver relationship, has provided a useful framework for understanding couple functioning. Interactions between infants and their caregivers help form internal working models of relationships that inform whether they view themselves as worthy of love as well as whether they perceive attachment figures as responsive, sensitive, and trustworthy (Bowlby, 1988). Attachment insecurity exists on a spectrum, with anxious attachment indicating fears of abandonment, relationship worry, and a magnified need for emotional reassurance from a romantic partner (Bartholomew et al., 1997). On the opposite end of the spectrum, avoidant attachment represents a discomfort with intimacy and relationship closeness, difficulty with self-disclosure and emotional vulnerability (Shaver & Mikulincer, 2012). Research has revealed that couples with secure attachment style may benefit from outcomes such as long lasting, high quality relationships characterized by substantial levels of trust, more positive emotions, and less conflict (Givertz, et al., 2013). Higher levels of avoidance and/or anxiety, however, are associated with lower levels of interpersonal trust, lower relationship quality, greater frequency of negative emotions and conflict, and loneliness in marriage (Givertz, et al., 2013). There are also fundamental differences in the way couples handle conflict based on individual attachment styles (Gouin et al., 2009). Therefore, attachment dynamics in couple relationships have provided vital information for therapists and a foundation for many therapy modalities. For those with intellectual disabilities (ID), romantic relationships are an extremely understudied topic (English, Tickle & dasNair, 2018) and attachment styles, relationship satisfaction, longevity, and quality are relatively ignored altogether (Fulford & Cobigo, 2018). Ignoring these areas of human development and functioning for adults with ID can have devastating impacts on their overall health and well-being. While adult attachment has been studied between individuals with disabilities and their parents (Schuengel et al., 2013), there is a need to develop a further understanding of this issue for couples and the impact it has on individual well-being and positive relationship experiences. This understanding can help couples with ID as well as family members and staff work more comprehensively with adults with ID. The current presentation will provide an overview of attachment theory, alongside a review of the unique factors that define couples with ID. Using a systemic perspective, this presentation will highlight a framework for applying an attachment-based understanding of couples with ID. This framework will be discussed and methods for applying this understanding to individuals and couples will be provided.

    Presenters
    avatar for Rebecca Kammes

    Rebecca Kammes

    Doctoral Candidate, Michigan State University


    Friday December 6, 2019 3:20pm - 4:10pm
    Meeting Room: Horse 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    3:20pm

    Changing Outcome Statistics: Postsecondary Education for Students with Intellectual and/or Developmental Disabilities
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Post-secondary education for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities can change the traditional outcomes for the students. Students who have spent an educational lifetime in separate classes or with separate curriculum and expectations can now have an opportunity to come out of those classes join the mainstream population and change their future through inclusive education. Through education, we can change the current gloomy statistics for this population. Currently, individuals with intellectual disabilities have about a 16% employment rate. But students with disabilities who are participating in inclusive post-secondary education have blown that statistic out of the water! In this session attendees were hear not only how post-secondary education can work, but also what it has done for one in particular. Attendees will also hear about what can be done in primary and secondary schools in order to prepare for students with disabilities to go to college, just like their typically developing peers.

    Presenters
    avatar for Edie Cusack

    Edie Cusack

    Executive Director, REACH Program College of Charleston
    Post-secondary education for students with mild intellectual and developmental disabilities.


    Friday December 6, 2019 3:20pm - 4:10pm
    Meeting Room: Eagle 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    3:20pm

    Comparative Models of Managed Long Term Services and Supports
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Between 2011 and 2016, the number of states operating a Managed Long Term Services and Supports (MLTSS) program dramatically expanded, from 12 to 22. Today, over half the country delivers long term services and supports, including home and community-based services, within a MLTSS framework. Though people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) have historically been excluded from MLTSS frameworks, this has begun to change with recent implementations in Iowa and Kansas including people with I/DD in the same managed care framework as seniors and people with physical disabilities. This session will provide a comparative perspective on MLTSS programs across the country and discuss one longstanding best practice model, Wisconsin's FamilyCare program, hearing from representatives from both state government and FamilyCare's largest MCO, Inclusa. Particular emphasis will be given to ensuring that people with disabilities, including people with I/DD, are able to access services in the most integrated setting. How can states and advocates work to ensure that MLTSS results in increased access to competitive integrated employment and community inclusion? What safeguards can be put in place to protect people with significant disabilities from medicalization or reduction in service quality? This session will help prepare advocates to engage on some of the most important policy issues facing the disability community today.

    Presenters
    AN

    Ari Ne'eman

    Ari Ne'eman is the President of the Autistic Self Advocacy Network, a non-profit advocacy organization run by and for autistic adults seeking to increase the representation of autistic people in society. From 2010 to 2015, he served as one of President Obama's appointees to the National... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 3:20pm - 4:10pm
    Meeting Room: Deer 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    3:20pm

    Effectively Preparing Teacher Candidates in an Online Graduate Program to Educate Students with Severe Disabilities in Academic Content
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Teacher candidates in an online graduate program can be effectively-prepared to educate students with severe disabilities in academic content. Teacher candidates are provided with preparation to include a diverse variety of students with severe disabilities in academic lessons in general education. These candidates master skills to plan, teach and assess students with disabilities in academic content through online learning strategies. This approach is successful to prepare students for successful edTPA results.

    Presenters
    avatar for Karena Duffy-Cooper

    Karena Duffy-Cooper

    Profession in Special Education, Western Carolina University


    Friday December 6, 2019 3:20pm - 4:10pm
    Meeting Room: Gila-Monster 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    3:20pm

    Faculty-Preferred Strategies to Support College Students with Disabilities
    Limited Capacity seats available

    The population of students with disabilities is ever increasing on college campuses; and inclusive education is important so that every student can have equal opportunities. The purpose of this review was to assess the use of Universal Design frameworks in higher education settings to create inclusive learning opportunities for all students, especially those with disabilities. Specifically, this review examined the attitudes of faculty toward Universal Design frameworks and college students with disabilities. To achieve the purpose of the study, the researchers examined studies that (1) were published in peer-reviewed journals from 2009 - 2019 and (2) included participants who are teaching in the U.S. higher education settings.


    Friday December 6, 2019 3:20pm - 4:10pm
    Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 2 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    3:20pm

    Involving Self-Advocates in Policy Research
    Limited Capacity seats available

    The benefits of including stakeholders in data-informed policy decisions include opportunities for meaningful social contribution and reduction of persistent disparities in accessing community services for individuals with disabilities. Such benefits require us to embrace stakeholder engagement as a crucial aspect of our work improving Medicaid systems, which greatly impact the lives of individuals with disabilities and their families. However, stakeholder engagement is often challenging due to resources, accessibility of complex topics, outreach to marginalized communities, and legislative timelines. In this presentation, we discuss three approaches that we use in our projects that successfully integrate stakeholder engagement. For each approach, we will provide examples of how we engage stakeholders in the process. Then, we will discuss with self-advocates and other attendees the ways they want to be involved in decisions that impact their services the most. The first approach we use involves engaging advisory committees made up of stakeholders with various roles and perspectives throughout the project. The next approach is collecting stakeholder perspectives via focus groups and/or surveys. The third approach involves stakeholder participation in the formation of project tasks and collecting data. This approach, informed by participatory action research principles, allows stakeholders to contribute their unique expertise and take ownership of the decision-making involved in data-informed policy research. We will facilitate discussion on how to best seek out collaborators and advocates, how individuals think typical methods of self-advocate engagement may be improved, and brainstorm new methods for ensuring individuals with disabilities are heard throughout the process of conducting research to inform policy. In addition to the facilitated conversation, we present examples of each type of approach in past work and note the strengths and barriers we encountered through our experiences. Finally, we offer solutions and tips based on our experiences.


    Friday December 6, 2019 3:20pm - 4:10pm
    Meeting Room: Ant 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    3:20pm

    Let's Get Rolling! Transportation: A Key Spoke in the Employment Wheel
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Employment First is the premise that everyone, including individuals with disabilities, especially those with significant disabilities, are capable of full participation in integrated employment and community life. To support Employment First, systems change is occurring on the federal, state, and local level, to align resources, policies, and practice. This change also pertains to transportation and mobility supports that enable individuals with significant disabilities to access inclusive employment. Transportation has been a weak spoke of the wheel to ensuring that everyone can get to work. Researchers indicate that students with autism and intellectual disabilities need transportation skills and supports to facilitate participation in the community (Flexer, Baer, Luft, & Simmons, 2013). Transportation challenges persist for individuals with disabilities well into adulthood, and national studies, such as those conducted by the National Council on Disability (2005), indicate that some people with disabilities who are willing and able to work cannot do so because of inadequate transportation. If we can't get to work, we can't work. The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) supports mobility management - an approach to ensuring that everyone can access inclusive community settings including get to work. Mobility management is a person-centered approach that includes designing and delivering transportation services that starts and ends with the individual using transportation. It begins with a community vision in which the entire transportation network public transit, private operators, cycling and walking, volunteer drivers, and others works together with customers, planners, and stakeholders to deliver the transportation options that best meet the community's needs. In the first part of the session, participants will learn about mobility management networks, and examples of solutions in communities across the country. Innovations such as shared-ride services and volunteer driver programs will be described as a way to implement a continuum of inclusive transportation supports beyond a traditional paratransit service. Information and resources that will be shared are intended to enhance awareness and knowledge of community mobility. The second portion of this presentation will be a facilitated conversation where attendees will share their own experiences: both challenges and successful outcomes and will learn from fellow attendees. Educators, support professionals, families, and individuals have a tremendous opportunity to learn about and leverage mobility management strategies by becoming active in these networks.

    Presenters
    avatar for Judy Shanley

    Judy Shanley

    AVP, Education & Youth Transition, Easterseals
    Judy L. Shanley, Ph.D. is Assistant Vice President, Education & Youth Transition at the national office of Easterseals in Chicago, IL. She supports the Easterseals network to implement evidence-based transition and workforce development practices and offers innovative solutions to... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 3:20pm - 4:10pm
    Meeting Room: Coyote 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    3:20pm

    Spelling My Way to Higher Education
    Limited Capacity seats available

    I am a 23-year old woman with autism going to college to pursue a degree in Biology, and work in the field of neuroscience research. I am fighting every day to have the same opportunities as my peers in higher education and employment. I am the first student at Montgomery College, Maryland, to graduate with an AS Science-Life Science degree, using a letter board and a communication partner. I am a Latina immigrant moving from Brazil to the U.S. with my family when I was five years old. Words come out of my mouth by impulses and compulsions, but very seldom do they express what I am thinking. Learning to spell on a letter board allowed me to conquer the basic human right to have a voice and to be heard. My outlook on life changed from despair to life with endless possibilities, because at that moment, I found my voice. My journey to college was not an easy one since I did not start communicating on a letter board until I was a sophomore in high school. However, it was a turning point in my life because it changed my path from a certificate of completion to a high school diploma. It was not an easy road, but it was a successful one because it created a path for many other students with autism after me. I started college by taking only one class, and my first day was a collection of feelings of accomplishment and dreams coming true. I added a course each semester until I started taking three classes. Every time I have an interaction with my professors or classmates, I hope to plant a seed of inclusion, acceptance, new possibilities, and equality for all. Last year, I was inducted into Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society, Kappa Omega Chapter. When I started college, I would stay only an hour or so on campus. Now my longer days are 12 hours, and those are the happiest ones. My goal is to live a life filled with meaning and purpose. I have goals to continue my education, pursue a career in neuroscience, and to live in a supportive and inclusive community. If you are going to dream, shoot for the stars. Because as you get higher each day, your view gets better, your problems look smaller, and the journey makes you stronger.

    Presenters

    Friday December 6, 2019 3:20pm - 4:10pm
    Meeting Room: Bird 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    3:20pm

    Supported Decision Making and Commonunity®
    Limited Capacity seats available

    We all need assistance in making important decisions. We consult with our families, our friends, and others whose advice we value and trust. For individuals with disabilities, having a strong support system can play an important role in maintaining independence and freedom to make their own life choices. Wisconsin recently passed a law recognizing Supported Decision-Making Agreements which formally designates friends, family members and other "supporters" to provide supported decision-making to adults with disabilities, including assistance in understanding the options, responsibilities, and consequences of that person's life decisions. Supported Decision Making Agreements do not give supporters the authority to make decisions for the individual, but it recognizes that individuals with disabilities can benefit from receiving advice and support from those they trust when making important life choices. We will explore the concept of Supported Decision-Making Agreements in a managed care setting, how the agreements support people in maintaining their independence and how the agreements encourage self-advocacy and self-determined decision-making. Inclusa is a unique Managed Care Organization. We have developed and trademarked an approach to managed care called Commonunity®. Commonunity® is defined as "a way of living which brings together the basics - connection to community, opportunity to work, a place to call 'home,' the ability to get where I need to go - to create the life of my choosing." The five areas of focused consideration in this approach are: Self-Determination, Community Living, Integrated Employment, Mobility and Community Connections. We encourage individuals we serve to use formal and informal supports to assist in their decision making process. Supported Decision-Making Agreements can be used to formally delegate specific supporters in very specific areas. For example, in the five areas of Commonunity, a person may have five different supporters - dependent on the expertise of the chosen supporter. Though the supporter has no legal decision-making power, the identified supporter can play an important role, along with Inclusa care teams, in helping individuals we serve make decisions that best meet their desired outcomes and live self-determined lives.

    Presenters

    Friday December 6, 2019 3:20pm - 4:10pm
    Meeting Room: Quail 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    3:20pm

    The State of Inclusion and Exclusion of Students with Extensive Support Needs in California School Districts
    Limited Capacity seats available

    This study explored the state of placement of students with disabilities (SWD) in districts across the State of California and the relationship between placement and economic and demographic factors. Results suggest significant variability in classroom placement, relationships between placement and factors, such as race and expenditure, and alarmingly low access to general education classrooms for students with extensive support needs. A continued focus on access to placement in regular classes for SWD is apparent across the United States and many other countries (Ainscow & Cesár, 2006; Drudy & Kinsella, 2009). Despite the increasing attention to placement in regular classes, SWD continue to be educated away from their peers without disabilities (e.g., Morningstar, Kurth, & Kozleski, 2014; Porter, 2004). Furthermore, there is significant variability in placement in, or access to, general education for SWD (Cosier, White, & Wang, 2018). The variability in placement and limited access to general education for SWD, and particularly for students with extensive support needs, highlights the need to identify factors associated with placement and then address the role of current policy, while also recognizing future policy needs.

    Presenters
    avatar for Audri Gomez

    Audri Gomez

    Associate Director, Thompson Policy Institute on Disability-Chapman University


    Friday December 6, 2019 3:20pm - 4:10pm
    Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 1 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    3:20pm

    Transition and Inclusion of Youth with Disabilities in the Community in Portugal
    Limited Capacity seats available

    In Portugal, after completion of compulsory schooling, young people with disabilities and their families are confronted with the absence of a support service that allows them to pursue a future in meaningful work or community inclusion as an alternative to sheltered workshops. A pilot project focusing on the inclusion of youth with disabilities in their community and integrated employment was developed in six regions of Portugal in an attempt to fill this gap. The aim of the project was to support the inclusion of people with disabilities in activities in natural contexts, through the mobilization of existing resources in the community, such as municipalities, companies, services and various organizations. Each project supported the development of meaningful activities in the community including: socio-professional experiences in real work contexts, cultural, sports, and leisure and volunteer activities. The goal was to provide opportunities for youth with disabilities to acquire skills and a support network that enables them to be the active agents themselves in building a life of higher quality and included in the community. The presenters will discuss the main findings from a follow-up study which assessed the pilot-projects.

    Presenters
    avatar for Lúcia Canha

    Lúcia Canha

    Pos-doc Researcher, University of Lisbon
    Lúcia Canha Ph.D., in the last decade has coordinated pilot projects in the field of community and professional integration of people with disabilities and at this moment she is developing a post-doctoral project in this area in partnership with the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee... Read More →
    avatar for Laura Owens

    Laura Owens

    President, TransCen Inc.
    Laura A. Owens, Ph.D., CESP, has over 30 years of experience as a national leader in the transition and disability employment field. She is currently a Professor in the Department of Teaching and Learning at the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee (UWM) and the President of TransCen... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 3:20pm - 4:10pm
    Meeting Room: Roadrunner 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    3:20pm

    Universal Design: Inclusive Postsecondary Education for Students with Intellectual Disabilities
    Limited Capacity seats available

    As college or some form of postsecondary education (PSE) continues to serve as a prerequisite for employment, it is important that all students have access to PSE. The passage of the Higher Education Opportunity Act has provided students with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities (IDD) a pathway to college. While progress has been made in making PSE accessible for students with IDD, there are still areas of growth that can be explored for making PSE accessible and inclusive. Diversity practices aligned with tenets of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) can be a pragmatic solution for meeting the needs of students as PSE continues to grow. However, for university staff and faculty who may not have experience working with students with extensive learning needs, support in doing so may be required. This presentation will present strategies and methods utilized in a PSE program supporting students with ID/D and highlight how successful collaborations with instructors were formed, and ultimately how practices aligned with the tenets of UDL were embedded within the course to support fully inclusive course offerings for students with ID/D. Additionally, data from an initial instructor training will be shared and future research to measure instructor growth and effectiveness of trainings will be discussed.

    Presenters
    avatar for Karl Wennerlind

    Karl Wennerlind

    Associate Director, Project FOCUS at UNLV
    ML

    Matthew Love

    Assistant Professor, San Jose State University
    Dr. Matthew Love is an Assistant Professor at San Jose State University. His research line is primarily focused on how instructional technology, desgined to adhere to the tenents of universal design for learning, can be used to support the inclusion of students with disabilities in... Read More →
    avatar for Stephanie Devine

    Stephanie Devine

    Assistant Professor, Georgia Southern University


    Friday December 6, 2019 3:20pm - 4:10pm
    Meeting Room: Buzzard 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    4:25pm

    Being Independent with Smart Technology
    Limited Capacity seats available

    People are making their homes “smart” by using technology. In doing this, the most mundane tasks are becoming accessible thru the use of web-based programs and apps for iPhones or Android platforms. People can save money using lights that use less electricity; they can control the temperature in their homes by pressing a button in an app on their phone or tablet; they can see who has come to their door by looking at their phone. Because these controls are convenient, easy, and gaining in popularity, companies are actively designing new ways to give people even more control of their environment with their phones or tablets. With that being said, an unexpected result of this “smart” technology has occurred. In making controls for everyday tasks accessible on phones or tablets, companies are making them accessible to people with disabilities and creating opportunities for those individuals to have more independence in daily life. As these apps and appliances/modules become more popular and universally available, their cost lowers and this makes them more obtainable for those with disabilities who, in the past, needed to spend hundreds of dollars to purchase and use environmental controls (ECUs). With the technology that is available today, a person can control anything with a simple modification and the modifications are cost effective. In this presentation, I will talk about ways that people with disabilities can convert their home into a “smart” home. As a person with a disability, I have personal experience in living and growing through the changes in technology that allow me to control my environment more cost-effectively and simply. I will share my journey to converting my own home into a smart one and the issues that arose in the process and how those were resolved. I will discuss how to pick the right devices to use based on purpose, need and efficiency. Resources will be shared for those interested in setting up their own “smart” home.

    Presenters
    avatar for Christopher Lenart

    Christopher Lenart

    Disability Awareness
    I am Chris Lenart and am a blogger and a public speaker. I am currently in Partners in Policymaking in Illinois (2019-2020). I was a programmer analyst at HSBC (1994-2009). In 2008, I received my Master's degree in Software Engineering from DePaul University.


    Friday December 6, 2019 4:25pm - 5:15pm
    Meeting Room: Deer 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    4:25pm

    Capacity Building: Lay Educational Advocacy as an Inclusion Strategy
    Limited Capacity seats available

    This presentation describes the work of two organizations in different regions of the country who have endeavored to develop a network of passionate advocates to sit beside families and students with disabilities to assist educational teams with the development of fully inclusive educational plans. It will describe a mature program that has operated for more than 20 years in Georgia and the development of a replication of that program in Nebraska. The presentation will describe the philosophical basis for the programs and the training methods designed to give advocates the knowledge and confidence they needed to assist families to prepare for and successfully argue for inclusive educational experiences for their students.

    Presenters
    PC

    Patricia Cottingham

    Inclusive Education Lay Advocacy Coordinator, Disability Rights Nebraska
    avatar for Leslie Lipson

    Leslie Lipson

    Attorney, Lipson Advocacy: Educational, Legal and Strategy Specialist
    Talk to me about advocacy solutions using general educational and special education law, from a values-based foundation and mindset of presuming competence. My practice supports both attorneys and non-attorney advocates to succeed in school-based advocacy. Talk to me about grassroots... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 4:25pm - 5:15pm
    Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 1 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    4:25pm

    Inclusive Recreational Programming
    Limited Capacity seats available

    As school ends, families look to provide their children with a typical summer experience. Summer camps provide routine and recreational opportunities for children to express creativity, achieve and master new skills and build friendships. Nearly 9 percent of children in North America are defined as having significant disabilities (National Center for Education Statistics, 2016). Due to an increase in disability prevalence, there is a strong need to provide summer camp experiences for all children. Inclusive recreational programming can be particularly important for youth with autism to practice social skills, physical aptitude and increase social motivation. It is vital to provide proper training and supports to families and staff to provide a meaningful recreational experience. In this training, participants will learn the benefits of inclusive recreational programs, effective strategies for all individuals including behavioral skills training (BST), and explore ways to transform their current program to become more inclusive. National Center for Education Statistics (2016). Children and youth with disabilities.

    Presenters
    MM

    Megan Mann

    Clinical Consultant, Southwest Autism Research and Resource Center


    Friday December 6, 2019 4:25pm - 5:15pm
    Meeting Room: Rattlesnake 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    4:25pm

    Leisure/Recreation: A Key Quality of Life Indicator in Transition Education
    Limited Capacity seats available

    There are five major tenants in transition: academics, employment, independent living, community access, and leisure/recreation. Four of those are undeniably important, however, one could argue that to have a true quality of life, one must have enjoyable activities and groups to spend time with, respectively leisure/recreation.

    Presenters
    avatar for Amy Williamson

    Amy Williamson

    CrossingPoints Program Coordinator, The Unviersity of Alabama
    Amy Williamson, Ph.D., currently serves as the CrossingPoints Program Coordinator at The University of Alabama. She has worked with young adults with intellectual disabilities for over 15 years, both through the education system as well as other community based programing. Dr. Williamson’s... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 4:25pm - 5:15pm
    Meeting Room: Horse 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    4:25pm

    Managing Transition Within A Diverse Inclusive Higher Education Program
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Students navigate transition upon entering college, through their academics, and when planning for employment. While transition planning is not formally defined in IDEA, it is important that students are involved in the process to encourage their involvement and confidence in implementing their goals. Members of the leadership team at Syracuse University's InclusiveU will detail what they have found successful on their campus. We recognize the diversity of goals, abilities, and resources for each student and institution of higher education. This variance makes implementing a one-size-fits-all practice difficult. Participants will collaborate with other attendees to discuss the major transitions students face, the problems students face in the midst of each transition, and solutions they have found effective to overcoming challenges. This session intends to challenge attendees to think innovatively when approaching transition planning through all phases of the college experience.

    Presenters
    avatar for Samuel Roux

    Samuel Roux

    Syracuse University - Taishoff Center for Inclusive Higher Education
    Brianna Shults and I represent the Taishoff Center for Inclusive Higher Education at Syracuse University. Our flagship program is InclusiveU. We empower 80+ students with developmental and intellectual disabilities to fully immerse themselves in academics and culture on campus. Ask... Read More →
    avatar for Brianna Shults

    Brianna Shults

    Internship and Employment Coordinator, Syracuse University - Taishoff Center for Inclusive Higher Education
    Internship and Employment Coordinator for InclusiveU’s Project SEARCH program. She holds a B.S. in Biology and a MSed, along with a teaching certificate, from Le Moyne College. She is currently pursuing a Masters in Public Administration. She comes to Syracuse University from a... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 4:25pm - 5:15pm
    Meeting Room: Eagle 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    4:25pm

    Practical Strategies for Doing Solidarity Work to Resist Ableism
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Disabled self-advocates and nondisabled family members, professionals, researchers, and policymakers often have the same ultimate goals in mind - meaningful opportunity, access, community integration, empowerment - but vastly different ideas of what those things mean or how to get there. Even experienced and committed advocates and attorneys often do not understand how they can best collaborate with and learn from people with disabilities ourselves in strategizing for social justice and civil and human rights, especially those of us with communication-related disabilities. In this session, we will examine strategies that disabled people straddling the worlds of policy, law, research, academia, and services have used successfully to bring self-advocacy and disability rights and disability justice frameworks into spaces where we are often excluded or only tokenized. We will cover approaches to grantwriting, service design and delivery, nonhierarchical coalition-building, and resource redistribution, among others.

    Presenters
    avatar for Lydia Brown

    Lydia Brown

    Justice Catalyst Fellow, The Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law
    Lydia X. Z. Brown is a disability justice advocate, organizer, and writer whose work has largely focused on violence against multiply-marginalized disabled people, especially institutionalization, incarceration, and policing. In collaboration with E. Ashkenazy and Morénike Giwa-Onaiwu... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 4:25pm - 5:15pm
    Meeting Room: Ant 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    4:25pm

    Scheduling Structures: Promoting Access to General Education for ALL Students
    Limited Capacity seats available

    A key principle in an inclusive, restructured school is maintaining natural proportions (i.e., ensuring that the percentage of students with disabilities in any particular class does not significantly exceed the percentage in the school as a whole). If too many students with disabilities or students with challenging behavior or other support needs are placed in one section, the range of support needs will make the class difficult to teach and many of the benefits of inclusive education (e.g., access to the curriculum, peer models, high expectations) may be lost. This session will describe the steps for scheduling students in natural proportions in general education classes and options for assigning collaborative teaching roles to general and specialized educators. Examples from elementary and middle schools will be used to highlight how inclusive scheduling practices can build the capacity of schools to support all learners.


    Friday December 6, 2019 4:25pm - 5:15pm
    Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 3 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    4:25pm

    Site Based Administrators' Perspectives on Evidence Based Teaching Practices for Students with Intellectual Disability
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Results of a statewide survey on site-based administrator perceptions of EBPs for teaching students with ID will be presented. Details regarding responses and EBPs will be discussed using descriptive statistics. Implications will be discussed regarding administrator awareness and mentoring teachers. Summary: Evidence based practices (EBP) are essential for creating meaningful instruction to meet the needs of all learners. High quality instruction for students with an intellectual disability can be especially challenging without the use of EBP. Students with an intellectual disability have a wide variety of needs that must be addressed through systematic instruction and strategic planning. They require a broad and extensive curriculum (e.g., academic, social skills, life skills) while providing individualized and often highly variable levels of positive behavioral, health, and communication supports (Pennington, Courtade, Ault, & Delano, 2016). In this session we will present the results of a statewide survey of school site administrators (e.g., principals, assistant principals, deans). Respondents are those who indicated having the responsibility of supervising teachers of students with an intellectual disability. The survey focused on (1) administrator perceptions of evidence-based practices for teaching students with an intellectual disability, (2) their perceptions of teachers' implementation of such practices, and (3) administrators' perceptions of their ability to mentor the teachers on implementation of EBPs.

    Presenters
    JP

    Jodee Prudente

    Teacher/Leader/Student, WCSD/UNR
    I am a veteran special education teacher. I have primarily worked with students wit intellectual disabilities grades K-8. I have a Bachelors degree in Elementary and Special Education and a Masters in Special Education with a focus on students with intellectual and multiple disabilities... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 4:25pm - 5:15pm
    Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 2 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    4:25pm

    Sustainable, Systemic Educational Change Using Implementation Science
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Students with the most significant cognitive disabilities have experienced the least amount of movement towards inclusive education. Systemically changing educational opportunities for students with SCD has been a fight since the 70's. Looking at inclusive education through the lens of implementation science and building state-, district-, and school-level capacity shows promise for facilitating systemic change. Information about implementation science will be shared along with anecdotes from "real-life" experiences in facilitating change and building capacity through collaborative systems change efforts embedded in implementation science concepts. The overall goal of our work is to "Build Diverse and Inclusive Communities" through inclusive education opportunities for students with the most significant cognitive disabilities. In this session, learners will see the deliberate process of change through implementation science to create life-long change for persons with significant cognitive disabilities.


    Friday December 6, 2019 4:25pm - 5:15pm
    Meeting Room: Gila-Monster 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    4:25pm

    The Power of Self-Advocacy - An Expansion Effort in Georgia
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Presenters will discuss how we Georgia is expanding self-advocacy statewide by creating and supporting the foundation of a diverse and action-oriented statewide self-advocacy network. Georgia’s DD Council funded a grant to expand self-advocacy and awarded it to Sangha Unity Network (SUN). The goal of this innovative project is to promote, create and sustain local and statewide advocacy networks in the State of Georgia for individuals with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities. The multi-year project includes opportunities for self-advocates to learn specific skills, enhance competencies and advocate personally, in communities, and in the state of Georgia. We will describe our efforts in the two years of the project with connecting self-advocates and determining what capacity already exists in the various areas and where the opportunities are for improvement and stronger advocacy. We will talk about the leadership group coming together to name the new network and develop a vision. Uniting for Change is about uniting Georgians and influencing change by speaking up and taking control of our lives. Nearly 175 self-advocates participated in the first round of advocacy planning sessions in 7 cities across Georgia and 100 self-advocates attended the first Uniting for Change retreat in the second year. Self-advocates have told us what folks are interested in learning and doing, where people are already engaged where people are contributing, and where we can grow, strengthen and expand self-advocacy efforts in our state. Many of the self-advocates talked of how they wish their lives were different, wanting to & blow the roof off my sheltered life, use my voice and speak up for others, do things outside of the day program, learn how to write a letter and host a meeting, not be considered an afterthought, pick what times work for me and not what works for them. Our presentation will offer our process for developing and enhancing advocacy skill sets, supporting advocacy activities in local communities and at the state level, and how we stay connected. The self-advocacy networks are designed to bring people together to share ideas and to create opportunities for people to develop valued social roles and have multiple ways to contribute.

    Presenters
    avatar for Katie Chandler

    Katie Chandler

    Project Consultant, Sangha Unity Network
    Katie is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker who works with Sangha Unity Network as a Project Consultant. Throughout her career, she has worked as a direct support professional, advocate, clinical supervisor, facilitator and consultant. Previously she directed the Developmental Disability... Read More →
    avatar for Michelle Schwartz

    Michelle Schwartz

    Sangha Unity Network
    Michelle began her career as a licensed Speech-Language Pathologist and focusedher skills on developing functional communication systems for individuals who use non-traditional communication methods. Her expertise is in supporting individuals who experience autism, developmental and... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 4:25pm - 5:15pm
    Meeting Room: Quail 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    4:25pm

    Using Value-Based Purchasing with Supported Employment Providers to Increase Outcomes in Medicaid Programs
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Many Supported Employment funders and providers are looking for effective win-win reimbursement models to advance Employment First objectives. Value-based purchasing (VBP) offers a powerful alternative that can help states improve competitive employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities. This session will feature two speakers, one from Inclusa, Inc., Wisconsin's largest managed long-term care organization (MCO), and the other, a self-advocate who is a Member of Inclusa. You will hear the personal story related to gaining and sustaining competitive integrated employment, and the successes and challenges along the way. Inclusa will share how it has worked with Supported Employment providers to design and implement VBP for Supported Employment services. This session highlights how collaboration with employment service providers, MCO's and individuals with disabilities resulted in an innovative way to pay providers based on person-centered outcomes. These outcomes include increasing hours worked in competitive employment settings and shifting a focus from facility-based programming to fully integrated opportunities. As more states move Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) programs to managed care, the possibilities for MCO's to use VBP with Supported Employment providers increases. Given the reality that fee-for-service does not typically incentivize Supported Employment providers to maximize an individual's hours worked and use best practices for job match and job coaching that make incremental fading of paid supports possible, both MCO's and Supported Employment providers will be looking for better reimbursement models in order to advance Employment First goals. As a result, interest in the application of VBP of Supported Employment services is growing nationally. Given that fee-for-service inherently rewards service rather than outcomes, VBP applied to Supported Employment offers a powerful alternative that, if designed correctly, can help states improve integrated competitive employment participation among HCBS participants. Come to this session if you'd like to hear how a MCO, Inclusa, worked with its Supported Employment providers and Members to design and implement a model for value-based reimbursement for Supported Employment that data demonstrates has increased employment outcomes for individuals in a cost-effective way, and supported successful provider transformation.

    Presenters
    ES

    Erin Smith

    Executive Director-Community Resources and Provider Relations, Inclusa, Inc.
    My name is Erin Smith, and I will be a first time TASH attendee this December. I work for a Managed Care Organization in Wisconsin, called Inclusa, Inc., where I support our Provider Network Department. Inclusa supports 15,000 individuals in Wisconsin with long-term care needs,and... Read More →


    Friday December 6, 2019 4:25pm - 5:15pm
    Meeting Room: Coyote 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

    4:25pm

    Well, THAT will never work!
    Limited Capacity seats available

    Kathy and John, parents to now 30 year old daughter, Alexa, discuss their successful strategies for ensuring Alexa's full inclusion throughout her lifespan, starting at birth. However, a few years ago, John shared his concerns, written in short story style, to Kathy about his lack of faith that many of the barriers Alexa had faced could be successfully resolved. He never shared this with Kathy at the time because he wanted to be supportive of her vision and efforts. This discovery lead to this presentation, showing how our own attitudinal barriers can be as impactful as the systemic barriers that face people who have disabilities. The private thoughts John held internally during times of family problem-solving eventually evolved into a "paradigm shift" as he saw the successes accumulating. Amazing barrier-elimination steps became the norm for this family. Alexa benefited by attending regular classes in schools, accessing needed technology as it was invented, a wheel-chair lift on the regular bus, skating in her wheelchair at the neighborhood ice rink, playing street hockey with friends, using a power beach wheelchair, being a statistician of a girls ice hockey team, attending college, becoming employed, and owning a vehicle and home of her own (all modified for her unique needs). Kathy, John, and Alexa will share stories, steps taken, and lessons learned, and how other families can do the same.


    Friday December 6, 2019 4:25pm - 5:15pm
    Meeting Room: Roadrunner 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226
     
    Saturday, December 7
     

    8:29am

    About Breakout Sessions
    Breakout Presentations are delivered in assigned meeting rooms for 50 minutes.

      Saturday December 7, 2019 8:29am - 11:45am
      Sheraton Grand at Wild Horse Pass 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      8:30am

      A Million Little Things: Considerations for Building Thriving Inclusive Lives
      Limited Capacity seats available

      It's often the little things that make for living a good life. To be a part of a diverse, inclusive community, people with disabilities, their families and caregivers must dream big by looking beyond goals to ordinary, everyday life events. This includes everything from playdates, cultural celebrations, religious activities and sports to dating, marriage, college, work and end of life arrangements. We will share from both the parent and professional perspectives, things to consider at different stages of life and suggest resources that can help people build thriving, inclusive lives of their own.


      Saturday December 7, 2019 8:30am - 9:20am
      Meeting Room: Deer 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      8:30am

      AAC in the Inclusive Classroom
      Limited Capacity seats available

      An inclusive classroom is one that is thoughtful about all abilities. For a student that uses AAC (Alternative and Augmentative Communication), the truly inclusive classroom can be a place to thrive, participate and engage with peers. in the elementary setting, communication and literacy are woven together, and provide ample opportunities for expression and connection. Adult-led and peer supports need to be specific and strategic in order to facilitate meaningful participation, and allow for spontaneous interaction. There is balance of support, challenge, encouragement and incentive that is critical for AAC users to be successful in the inclusive classroom. This presentation will expand on the possibilities for how AAC users can be fully included, how family members and school staff can partner to support learning and growth, and how school communities can both provide and benefit from the inclusion of students with disabilities who use AAC.


      Saturday December 7, 2019 8:30am - 9:20am
      Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 3 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      8:30am

      AZ TASH's Chapter YOUth Leadership and Advocacy Strand: How to Start One in Your State
      Limited Capacity seats available

      Creators and facilitators for the AZ TASH YOUth strand will present and answer questions about their process in developing and running this exciting and vital component of their INclusive Practices Institute. The YOUth strand has been a part of the institute for 8 years and continues to provide an amazing inclusive experience for middle and high schoolers around the state. The strand provides a full day dive into ableism, privilege, intersectionality, challenging social constructs, leadership and advocacy. At the end of the institute, YOUth share out their learnings with all of the adults. Many adults have commented on institute evaluations that this is a highlight of the institute.

      Presenters

      Saturday December 7, 2019 8:30am - 9:20am
      Meeting Room: Scorpion 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      8:30am

      Barriers to Planning and Organizing Work-Based Learning Experiences for Students with Intellectual Disability
      Limited Capacity seats available

      This presentation will discuss findings from a research study that investigated the barriers teachers face when planning school and community-based work experiences for students with intellectual disability, and strategies for improving accessibility for students with significant support needs. This presentation directly aligns with the conference theme, Building Diverse and Inclusive Communities, by identifying barriers that hinder the participation of students in community-based employment. In order to promote student participation in community-based employment, it is imperative that these barriers are identified and addressed.

      Presenters
      avatar for Magen Rooney-Kron

      Magen Rooney-Kron

      Doctoral Student, University of Illinois- Urbana Champaign
      Hi! My name is Magen and I am a 3rd year doctoral student at U of I- Urbana Champaign. My research focus is on the employment of people with significant disabilities. I am interested in looking at the use of interagency collaboration and supported employment in supporting students... Read More →
      avatar for Stacy Dymond

      Stacy Dymond

      Professor, University of Illinois
      Stacy Dymond is professor of special education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research focuses on curriculum issues related to educating secondary and transition-age students with severe intellectual disabilities in inclusive school and community settings... Read More →


      Saturday December 7, 2019 8:30am - 9:20am
      Meeting Room: Buzzard 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      8:30am

      Becoming a Sexual Self-Advocate
      Limited Capacity seats available

      People with developmental disabilities are often left out of the conversation about sexuality, almost as if they are incapable of having thoughts, feelings, and needs. In reality, they, too, are sexual beings that need information and skills for making healthy decisions about sexuality. One of these skills in the ability to be a sexual self-advocate. As defined by Green Mountain Self Advocates, "Sexual Self Advocacy" means: "Speaking up for yourself, sexually"; "Getting information"; "Taking a stand"; "Saying to whomever: 'this is my choice'" "Stating your sexual limits and desires with your partner, respecting others' limits and desires"; and "Starting to do what you want with relationships." During this workshop, self-advocates will learn what is sexual self-advocacy, explore ways you can become a sexual self-advocate, and practice speaking up for the right to be in a relationship and for your rights within a relationship. This workshop aligns with the 2019 conference theme, Building Diverse and Inclusive Communities, by providing self-advocates with knowledge and skills to have happy, healthy relationship. Having the skills to be in relationships enriches our lives and makes inclusion possible. Diversity is addressed in the definition of sexual self-advocacy through the appreciation of all sexual orientations and gender identities as well as supporting all people with disabilities to be thought of as sexual beings from birth to death. It will empower individuals with I/DD to know their rights regarding relationships and within a relationship. It is a human right to be in relationships that are positive, enriching and not abusive.

      Presenters
      avatar for Tia Nelis

      Tia Nelis

      Director of Policy & Advocacy, TASH
      Tia Nelis is the Director of Policy & Advocacy for TASH. She comes to TASH after serving as Self-Advocacy Specialist at the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center within the Institute on Disability and Human Development at University of Illinois at Chicago. She also is one of... Read More →


      Saturday December 7, 2019 8:30am - 9:20am
      Meeting Room: Quail 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      8:30am

      Coaches vs. Counselors: Parental Role in Intimate Relationships Between Adults with IDD
      Limited Capacity seats available

      Although there are vast benefits of experiencing healthy intimate relationships in adulthood (Beckes & Coan, 2011; Cacioppo & Patrick, 2008; Moos, 2003; Robles, 2014), adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) are often denied these experiences (English et al., 2018; Fulford & Cobigo, 2018). This can often be due to restrictions placed on them from parents and other caregivers (Black & Kammes, 2019). However, these restrictions do not deter adults with ID from desiring intimate relationship experiences, leading to many of them engaging in secretive and often exploitative relationships (Black & Kammes, 2019; English et al., 2018). Despite this known pattern, there is still a gap in our understanding of the role parents/caregivers specifically play in their adult child's experiences of intimate relationships. This study used a systems theory and social model of disability approach to examine the role that parents/caregivers play in the creation and maintenance of intimate relationships for adults with IDD. This was done by asking parents who have an adult child with IDD, as well as a typically developing (TD) adult child, to compare their experiences between these two adult children. A mixed methods design including an online survey with 50 parents nationwide, as well as follow-up phone/video conferencing interviews with a subset of 20 parents was used. The findings of this study exhibit 5 main themes: 1) differing levels of parental involvement; 2) differing parental expectations; 3) differing parental roles; 4) parents as "gatekeepers" for intimate experiences of individuals with ID; and 5) barriers to romantic relationships for individuals with ID. This presentation will discuss the key findings of the current study and provide important implications of the study for adults with IDD, their parents/caregivers, and others who work with them. Further information on defining and working with couples with IDD will also be presented.

      Presenters
      avatar for Rebecca Kammes

      Rebecca Kammes

      Doctoral Candidate, Michigan State University


      Saturday December 7, 2019 8:30am - 9:20am
      Meeting Room: Horse 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      8:30am

      Curriculum and Instruction for Secondary-Age Students with Severe Disabilities and Intensive Nursing Supports at School
      Limited Capacity seats available

      This presentation describes practitioner strategies for addressing curriculum and instruction for students with severe disabilities and intensive nursing supports at school. The information in this presentation aligns with the TASH theme, Building Diverse and Inclusive Communities, because it focuses on strategies to promote equity, opportunity, and inclusion for students who have severe disabilities and complex health care needs that require personal nursing supports at school. This population has historically been served in home-hospital, institutional settings, and self-contained classrooms. This problem persists to the present day. Students who require direct nursing care are frequently grouped in segregated settings to share a classroom nurse. And therefore, may be marginalized based on the complexity of their health support needs. The persistence of a medical-model in special education, particularly for this population, may result in educational programming characterized by caretaking versus curriculum and instruction based on high expectations. Advancing effective practices in curriculum and instruction for this population will promote this population's equitable access to learning and achievement. This presentation will address strategies for (a) collaborating with 1:1 nurses, (b) instruction during health care, and (c) balancing health care with curriculum and instruction in inclusive settings and activities. Participants will have opportunities to engage in the presentation through question and answers, and whole group discussion.

      Presenters

      Saturday December 7, 2019 8:30am - 9:20am
      Meeting Room: Rattlesnake 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      8:30am

      Inclusive Teacher Preparation: Experiences and Findings of an Educator Preparation Program
      Limited Capacity seats available

      This session focuses on transforming teacher education to reflect the skills, competencies and dispositions necessary for teachers to assume the role of inclusion specialist. We will describe results from an emergent evaluation of learning experiences designed to develop teaching and advocacy skills leading to agentic behaviors whereby special educators transform segregated services to inclusive systems change. We seek to identify and explain the process and critical influences of teachers' growth toward inclusion. The TASH Conference theme of "Building Diverse and Inclusive Communities" is addressed in this presentation by sharing our creative and innovative methods for teachers and teacher preparation professionals to combat the barriers to inclusion that persist in U.S. Schools. Participants will leave with creative ideas for promoting and engaging in agentic action towards inclusive practices.

      Presenters
      avatar for Jennifer Kurth

      Jennifer Kurth

      Associate Professor, University of Kansas
      Inclusive Education
      avatar for Kristin Lyon

      Kristin Lyon

      Research Associate, University of Kansas


      Saturday December 7, 2019 8:30am - 9:20am
      Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 1 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      8:30am

      Perceptions of Participation: A Qualitative Case Study Exploring How a Student with Significant Disabilities Participates in an Inclusive Classroom
      Limited Capacity seats available

      This qualitative case study explores how a student with significant disabilities in the lower mainland of British Columbia participates an inclusive classroom, using The Canadian Model of Occupational Performance and Engagement (CMOP-E) as a theoretical framework. CMOP-E comes from the field of occupational therapy (OT) and offers a unique perspective on participation, by examining interactions between factors of the person, environment, and the activity (Polatajko, Townsend, & Craik, 2007). The purpose of this study was to further develop theory of school participation of students with significant disabilities and promote a shared understanding of participation between occupational therapists and educators. Results of this study suggest a student with significant disabilities participates in the social life of an inclusive classroom when they are part of a group and when their individual learning goals are woven into classroom activities and routines. When it comes to academic inclusion, a student with significant disabilities only participates in a restricted role, with little engagement in curricular content. Findings suggest that personal factors of the student (e.g., communication skills) facilitate participation, but also reveal that personal factors of all classroom members (e.g., values, skills, and role of the teacher and education assistant; student perceptions of participation) and how these factors interact with each other are more influential than the individual student factors alone. Results of this study support the need for further development of the relationship between OT and school participation and for continued research and development of collaborative practices between educators and specialists.

      Presenters
      avatar for Sarah Skinner

      Sarah Skinner

      I am a doctoral student in the Faculty of Education at the University of British Columbia, studying under the supervision of Dr. Jennifer Katz and Dr. Janet Jamieson. My research interests focus on participation of students with significant disabilities in inclusive classrooms and... Read More →


      Saturday December 7, 2019 8:30am - 9:20am
      Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 2 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      8:30am

      School-community Partnerships: The Collaborative Practices of Special Educators Supporting Transition-aged Students
      Limited Capacity seats available

      Successful transition outcomes for youth with disabilities necessitate collaboration within and beyond the school system. Ideally, this collaboration entails a wide range of professionals across school systems, service systems, and communities coming together to contribute to transition planning, services, and supports as part of a "transition network." This session highlights findings from a mixed-methods study of 509 middle and high school special educators including (a) the characteristics of "transition networks," (b) what factors are associated with network size, and (c) educators' perspectives and experiences related to their transition networks. These findings have important implications for special educators, school administrators, and district staff.

      Presenters
      avatar for Erik Carter

      Erik Carter

      Professor, Vanderbilt University
      Erik Carter is Cornelius Vanderbilt Professor of Special Education at Vanderbilt University. His research and teaching focuses on evidence-based strategies for supporting inclusion, belonging, and valued roles in school, work, community, and congregational settings for children and... Read More →


      Saturday December 7, 2019 8:30am - 9:20am
      Meeting Room: Coyote 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      8:30am

      Using Dyadic Interviews to Include Adults with IDD and Their Siblings in Qualitative Research
      Limited Capacity seats available

      The perspectives of adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) are needed to fill gaps in the literature and ensure that research about people with IDD is relevant to them. Siblings of adults with IDD assume a variety of advocacy and caregiving roles with respect to their brothers and sisters with IDD. Both perspectives are important to understand their relationship and factors that affect their interactions within diverse and inclusive communities. Previous sibling research has been based heavily on the perspectives of the siblings without IDD and their parents. Considerations in the research design and supports offered need to be identified to allow adults with IDD to meaningfully participate. Through a qualitative study with nine sibling pairs who ranged from 19 to 57 years old, we explored the use of dyadic interview methods and strategies to support the participation of adults with IDD in semi-structured interviews. The research design and supports used will be described as well as suggestions for future research including adults with IDD.

      Presenters
      avatar for Sarah Hall

      Sarah Hall

      Research Associate, University of Minnesota
      avatar for Dr. Zach Rossetti

      Dr. Zach Rossetti

      Boston University Wheelock College of Education & Human Development
      Zachary Rossetti, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Special Education in the Boston University Wheelock College of Education & Human Development. His research examines the experiences of families with children with intellectual and developmental disabilities, including autism, by... Read More →
      avatar for Meghan Burke

      Meghan Burke

      Associate Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


      Saturday December 7, 2019 8:30am - 9:20am
      Meeting Room: Ant 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      8:30am

      Visual Supports for ALL Students
      Limited Capacity seats available

      This presentation will incorporate developing an understanding of the working memory capacity for students of various ages, in order to support developing understanding as to why increased visuals should be used in every classroom to support challenging behavior and increased learning. Examples of many visuals will be shown as part of this presentation with opportunities for participants to determine how they can adapt these supports to their unique classroom structure.

      Presenters

      Saturday December 7, 2019 8:30am - 9:20am
      Meeting Room: Gila-Monster 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      8:30am

      When the Rubber Hits the Road: Inclusion and Transition
      Limited Capacity seats available

      What do we know about creating a meaningful life after high school? The presenters discuss their personal and professional perspectives around transition for their sons who were successfully included during their school-aged years. Although both presenters hold doctorates in special education and have spent much of their professional lives teaching about and advocating for inclusive education, neither were prepared for the challenges faced as their sons left school and transitioned into the adult world. The presenters will discuss what they learned on their journey and provide recommendations for illuminating the path forward.

      Presenters
      avatar for Dina Traniello

      Dina Traniello

      Fitchburg State University


      Saturday December 7, 2019 8:30am - 9:20am
      Meeting Room: Eagle 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      9:35am

      Communication for All: Building a Community of Support for Communication
      Limited Capacity seats available

      An important part of the work in building diverse and inclusive communities is ensuring that all members of a community are able to effectively communicate with each other and have access to the tools that will support their method(s) of communication. A broad perspective on communication moves beyond speech to encompass a variety of methods which might include augmentative/alternative communication (AAC), American Sign Language (ASL) and written communication where forms such as email and texting have become critical to social connection and community participation. This diversity in the way that people communicate requires that service providers also have a diversity of supports in place so that people have access to skilled communication partners, instruction in their preferred method of communication and access to any technology that is needed for communication. A panel of representatives from two developmental service agencies from Vermont will discuss steps that they have taken to improve support for communication across all levels of their organizations. Panel members will include an augmentative communication user who will discuss his work in advocacy, mentoring, and training within his agency and agency staff who will share ideas how to build a system of support for communication within a service provider organization.

      Presenters
      avatar for Tracy Thresher

      Tracy Thresher

      Mentor and Communication Consultant, Washington County Mental Health
      Tracy Thresher is a native Vermonter who lives and works in Vermont. Tracy began using Facilitated Communication in 1990 and was one of the first individuals with autism in Vermont to be introduced to the method. He has presented at local, statewide and national workshops and conferences... Read More →
      avatar for Pascal Cheng

      Pascal Cheng

      Education and Communication Specialist, Howard Center
      I currently work for the Howard Center in Burlington, Vermont as an educational and communication specialist, providing training and consultation in the areas of augmentative/alternative communication, assistive technology and literacy for children and adults with developmental disabilities... Read More →


      Saturday December 7, 2019 9:35am - 10:25am
      Meeting Room: Roadrunner 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      9:35am

      Hear Me Now: Reflections from a Participatory Action Research Project
      Limited Capacity seats available

      The purpose of this presentation is to provide an overview of the research and training Center on health and function participatory action research framework. Discussions about training and evaluation of the participatory action research component will be discussed.

      Presenters
      RC

      Richard Chapman

      Ph.D. Student, The University of South Florida


      Saturday December 7, 2019 9:35am - 10:25am
      Meeting Room: Ant 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      9:35am

      Inclusion Model in the Elementary School Setting
      Limited Capacity seats available

      We have a very unique inclusion model where all our students with special needs are included in our larger classrooms. Irving's model of inclusive practices has enabled a significant number of our special education students to make amazing strides in their academic growth as well as blending among their peers socially. Our inclusion students work on grade level curriculum with interventions, accommodations, and modifications as necessary, narrowing the achievement gap between them and their age-appropriate peers. High expectations for students and a growth mindset at Irving ensure ALL students achieve at higher levels with rigorous curriculum. One of the ways we accomplish this is through our very active inclusive practices model for our students with diverse needs. Through this model, we provide a continuum of services to ensure every students' needs are met and support is given to each individual student. Our goal is to provide students with diverse needs the opportunity to learn with their age appropriate peers while being exposed to grade level curriculum. This helps to bridge the achievement gap and allow them more opportunities for success. Our inclusion staff works diligently to ensure our inclusion students are given the attention and support they require. As part of our model, all inclusion students spend as much time as is appropriate in the core curricular areas with their peers. This is accomplished by our inclusion teachers and instructional assistants facilitating and providing support in the larger classroom environment. They collaborate with teachers on a consistent basis to help plan and assist with modifications, materials, and accommodations. The unique needs of our inclusion students are also met during our interventions. Inclusion staff pushes into these interventions, using their specialized training and resources to work with small groups of students. Our inclusion model allows our inclusion staff to work with ALL students during interventions, not just students on IEPs. You will often see a mixed grouping of students with or without an IEP in our intervention groups facilitated by our inclusion staff. Sometimes our inclusion students are doing well on a particular skill and they fall into a higher group. This has been a huge benefit towards helping all students make more growth and has allowed us to rely on the expertise of our inclusion staff in recognizing students that may need referrals for further evaluation. Our Inclusion Center services those students who need targeted pull-out for specific academic skills. Students work with inclusion teachers and instructional assistants in small group settings to receive extra interventions and support for skills they are unable to master in the larger classroom setting. The amount of time spent in the Inclusion Center varies for each child depending on their needs and skills. We no longer have self-contained classrooms at Irving. It is amazing to walk into a classroom and see our inclusion students working right alongside their age appropriate peers. We are not only helping them to grow socially, but academically as well. Since the implementation of our inclusion model, our students have made outstanding growth and are performing grade level skills, some with accommodations or modifications. We have narrowed the achievement gap between them and their peers.

      Presenters
      avatar for Melanie Bailey

      Melanie Bailey

      Inclusion/SLD Teacher, Mesa Public Schools
      I have been in public education for 29 years. I have a dual degree in Elementary and Special Education with a Masters in Elementary Education (all from Northern Arizona University). My calling is truly in the realm of special education and I am a tremendous advocate of inclusive... Read More →


      Saturday December 7, 2019 9:35am - 10:25am
      Meeting Room: Rattlesnake 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      9:35am

      Inclusion: Changing Minds, Building Capacity, and Intentional Planning
      Limited Capacity seats available

      Maryland Coalition for Inclusive Education (MCIE) has partnered with Calvert County Public School District (CCPSD) to make inclusive education a reality. This session will highlight several students from "demonstration schools", working to transform their practices to include all learners. Through their stories we will explain the process of systems change: capacity building at a district and school building level, data collection, professional development for faculty and staff, and intentional student planning. We will share an overview of planning tools we use to support students, teachers, and families. We will also share students' voices to demonstrate a growth mindset and teachers' voices to demonstrate the value of collaborative planning, scheduling, and flexible IEPs. MCIE and CCPS have focused on the partnership and building capacity model so that, as we continue on this journey together, inclusion moves from being a buzz word to a practice centered on relationships, membership and participation that is ingrained in the fabric of the school and community as the standard.


      Saturday December 7, 2019 9:35am - 10:25am
      Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 2 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      9:35am

      Interactions in Public Spaces During Community-based Instruction
      Limited Capacity seats available

      In education, the use of community-based instruction (CBI) is a recommended practice for learning skills that promote the ability of students with severe disabilities to participate more fully in their communities. While studies have investigated the effectiveness of CBI in acquiring and generalizing community skills, there is no research investigating students' interactions with others during CBI. This exploratory qualitative study was undertaken to understand how eight high school students with severe disabilities interacted with others (e.g., community members, peers, school staff) during CBI and how contextual factors (e.g., activity, setting, supports) influenced their interactions. Data were collected through observations of students during CBI, and interviews with special education teachers and paraprofessionals who delivered instruction. Findings indicated that students primarily interacted with others while (a) participating in instructional interactions, (b) getting their needs met, and (c) engaging in social exchanges. Type of activity, previous exposure to setting, and availability of supports served to promote or hinder interactions.

      Presenters
      avatar for Shari Hopkins

      Shari Hopkins

      Assistant Professor, Western Oregon University
      avatar for Stacy Dymond

      Stacy Dymond

      Professor, University of Illinois
      Stacy Dymond is professor of special education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research focuses on curriculum issues related to educating secondary and transition-age students with severe intellectual disabilities in inclusive school and community settings... Read More →


      Saturday December 7, 2019 9:35am - 10:25am
      Meeting Room: Eagle 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      9:35am

      Meaningful Mathematics Instruction for Students with Intellectual Disability
      Limited Capacity seats available

      In this presentation, we will present our work on combining evidence-based practices within the Concrete - Semiconcrete - Abstract instructional framework to teach students with intellectual and developmental disabilities to solve additive, result-unknown word problems in inclusive general education mathematics classrooms. We will also present our findings on the impact of the intervention on student strategy use as well as the social validity of the intervention, as reported by paraprofessionals and teachers.

      Presenters
      avatar for Jessica Bowman

      Jessica Bowman

      Doctoral Candidate, University of Utah


      Saturday December 7, 2019 9:35am - 10:25am
      Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 3 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      9:35am

      Quantity and Quality of Research on Physical Activity for Learners with Significant Disabilities in Schools
      Limited Capacity seats available

      This systematic review identified quantity and quality of intervention research targeting increases in physical activity (PA) skills and access for students with significant disabilities (SD) in schools for a 20 year time period. Eligible studies were evaluated according to What Works Clearinghouse and Horner et al. (2005) quality indicators. Finally, interventions from eligible studies were evaluated for evidence based practice designation. This research aligns with the conference theme because the documented health disparities faced by people with SD are one of many examples of inequities between this population and those who are typically developing. It is therefore important to identify promising interventions to address exercise habits and improve health and well-being beginning in childhood for those with SD.

      Presenters
      BG

      Brianna Grumstrup

      Doctoral Student, University of Nevada, Reno


      Saturday December 7, 2019 9:35am - 10:25am
      Meeting Room: Horse 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      9:35am

      Reporting Present Levels of Performance: Narratives and their Consequences for Students with Significant Support Needs
      Limited Capacity seats available

      The IEP process is a social forum in which teams of professionals make decisions in relation to individual students with disabilities. However, as Brantlinger (1997) described, "Disability is a social construct that can be illogical, damaging, and imbued with others "vested interests"" (p. 431). In the current study, we examine how disabilities are constructed in the IEP. We present our analysis of the statements of present level of functional and academic performance (PLFAAP) in 88 IEPs of students with significant support needs in order to understand the assumptions of team members as they construct IEPs and justify their decisions.

      Presenters
      avatar for Andrea Ruppar

      Andrea Ruppar

      University of Wisconsin-Madison
      avatar for Jennifer Kurth

      Jennifer Kurth

      Associate Professor, University of Kansas
      Inclusive Education
      avatar for Katie McCabe

      Katie McCabe

      University of Wisconsin-Madison


      Saturday December 7, 2019 9:35am - 10:25am
      Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 1 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      9:35am

      Stakeholder's Perceptions of Best Practices Supporting the Transition Process
      Limited Capacity seats available

      Quality and collaborative transition plans for students with significant support needs has emerged as an area requiring continued improvement. This qualitative research study sought to understand how the current process of transition planning was implemented for students with significant support needs from the perspectives of current stakeholders working through the transition process. This presentation shares our findings, provides recommendations for use of best practices, and includes recommendations and resources to assist in creating meaningful plans for youths with significant support needs as they seek to transition to greater inclusive communities.


      Saturday December 7, 2019 9:35am - 10:25am
      Meeting Room: Coyote 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      9:35am

      Supporting Self-Determination and Employment through Supported Decision-Making
      Limited Capacity seats available

      Compared to youth without disabilities, integrated employment is lower for youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. In DC and Missouri, too many young people with disabilities still graduate from high school into a Day Program rather than college or a job and leave school with guardians, limiting their ability to make decisions about their lives just as they are entering adulthood. Missouri and DC are uniquely situated, in that each state has received two multi-year grants from the Administration on Community living and braided our strategies for success: Partnership in Employment Systems Change Project of National Significance grant and the National Supporting Families of People with Developmental Disabilities across the Lifespan Community of Practice (CoP). Through these grants, the states have established cross-agency relationships, and are implementing policy and program improvements, and transforming systems to support self-determination and increase integrated employment. This has required deep partnership with self-advocates, families, the UCEDD, the state developmental disabilities and vocational rehabilitation systems, the DD Council, and other community and government partners to raise expectations and transform our service systems. DC and Missouri are two of the initial 6 states to participate in the Supporting Families CoP, which involves collaborations at all levels to develop systems of support for families throughout the lifespan of their family member with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). The overall goal of supporting families, with all of their complexity strengths and unique abilities is so they can best support, nurture, love and facilitate opportunities for the achievement of self-determination, interdependence, productivity, integration, and inclusion in all facets of community life for their family members. This movement now involves seventeen states, with varying levels of involvements of UCEDDs. Both DC and MO have involved their UCEDDs from the inception of this initiative, with the UMKC UCEDD leading this national effort. Missouri and DC have leverage grant funding to support systems change, using the learning from the National Supporting Families of People with Developmental Disabilities Across the Lifespan CoP and the National Supported-Decision Making CoP, along with strong cross-agency and community-based partnerships to promote systems change that supports self-determination and competitive integrated employment. Key to this work is raising up the voices of self-advocates and their families, of all cultures, so that as we reform our systems we are guided by their experiences, challenges, and vision for a good life for themselves and their families. Families can be our greatest cheerleaders for person-centered and employment first systems change and our strongest advocates, or they can be barriers to systems change. In both DC and Missouri, as we undertook reforms to our developmental disabilities systems, we worked closely with the people we support and their families, using the LifeCourse framework and person-centered thinking to reframe vision of what success looks like at the individual and systems level and build a shared responsibility for systems change. One of the areas identified by self-advocates and family members in both states was the need to limit guardianship and return decision-making to the hands of people with disabilities, supported by their families. At the same time, self-advocates were demanding that the states do better at supporting them to achieve competitive integrated employment. Working closely with self-advocates and parents and with supports from national subject matter experts through the National Resource Center on Supported Decision-Making and the National Supporting Families CoP at UMKC, DC and Missouri have partnered with and supported self-advocates and families in successful systems change initiatives. In this session you will hear the national perspective on what s happening around the country to launch and grow supported decision-making and promote self-determination, inclusion, and competitive integrated employment; a discussion of how this is working in Missouri and DC; and a deep dive with a self-advocate and family members about how supported decision-making works in practice and some of the lessons learned. We will share promising practices at the individual and systems level and describe how various partners can help support self-advocates and family members to lead change. Panelists will share successes in engaging self-advocates and families to not only help them envision and plan a good life for themselves and their children, but also to better inform state systems changes through deep engagement with families and to successfully advocate for those changes. This session will conclude with an interactive question and answer panel discussing how to apply lessons learned in their own state.

      Presenters
      avatar for Erin Leveton

      Erin Leveton

      Director, Alvarez & Marsal
      avatar for Morgan Whitlatch

      Morgan Whitlatch

      Legal Director, Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities
      Morgan K. Whitlatch is the Legal Director of the Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities, an independent, non-profit advocacy organization that has been advancing the interests of D.C. residents with developmental disabilities since 2002. Morgan has devoted her legal career... Read More →


      Saturday December 7, 2019 9:35am - 10:25am
      Meeting Room: Scorpion 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      9:35am

      Transitioning to Independence; Community Style
      Limited Capacity seats available

      I'm graduating, now what? The transition from educational services to adulthood can be a challenging time for some people as daily life evolves and known structure and connections can be lost. This is a very important stage in one's life and is a critical time to build confidence and connections to their broader community. Learn how individuals within a Wisconsin community identified gaps and then worked collaboratively together to shape opportunities that have resulted in inclusive and quality lives for young adults. In this session, you will hear from Inclusa, Wisconsin's largest managed long-term care organization, a local YMCA, and a self-advocate who will share their story on how, in one community, they were able to co-create a space for individuals to build from each other's strengths and experiences, ultimately resulting in building one's own social capital. This collaboration began almost 6 years ago and has now evolved into two community groups supported by self-advocates (PINC - Partners in Nurturing Communities and TIL - Transitioning to Independent Lives). Based on these opportunities, many young adults have worked together to grow individual confidence in social situations and form new connections and relationships within their community.


      Saturday December 7, 2019 9:35am - 10:25am
      Meeting Room: Buzzard 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      9:35am

      Wearable Technology Informs More Empathetic and UDL-Focused Inclusive Practices
      Limited Capacity seats available

      Wearable technology has the power to change the way we view student behavior overnight. Objective monitoring of heart rate, sleep, temperature, and movement can show us patterns of stress that may not be visibly evident and may negate assumptions previously made about a student's challenging behavior. To support the TASH theme of Building Diverse and Inclusive Communities, we used wearable technology and trained staff to first be aware of how student regulation or dysregulation may impact successful inclusion. Many diverse students, but especially students with disabilities, may have a history of exposure to previous trauma, culturally unresponsive practices, and curriculum inaccessibility. A calm student can learn, a stressed student cannot. By actively monitoring and noticing trends educators learn to look for reasons a student may be dysregulated, and then ask themselves, "How can I help this student feel safe and successful in my environment?" Empowering educators with wearable technology data not only encourages more empathetic responses but also solidifies the urgent need for better UDL implementation.

      Presenters
      avatar for Cynthia Blasko

      Cynthia Blasko

      Co-founder, Connections through Communication


      Saturday December 7, 2019 9:35am - 10:25am
      Meeting Room: Gila-Monster 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      9:35am

      Who's Driving the Car and do the Driver and Passengers Know Where They are Going?
      Limited Capacity seats available

      In order to get anywhere we need to know where we are going and how to get there. Unfortunately, the right person is not always driving. The driver, the person who is providing the direction on where to go should be the person who is determining the destination. However, too often the passengers are driving the car and they take over and determine the destination. Over the past two years TLC, a Kent, WA non-profit, has been looking at why and how this happens and how do we change it. One of the main issues is the lack of understanding and buy in to the journey. While the person receiving support is clear about what they want, the supporter is not understanding the roadmap and what role they play in the support. We will share how technology, understanding how people learn and ensuring buy in will change how people take charge of their lives and how the people who provide support are able to support the goals. We will share the tools we have created with people we support and video interviews with the support persons describing the difference it has made. While it is still a work in progress we are seeing changes in who is driving the car and where the car goes.

      Presenters
      avatar for Jenny Lengyel

      Jenny Lengyel

      Executive Director, Total Living Concept
      avatar for Nanette Vanderford

      Nanette Vanderford

      Total Living Concept
      AZ

      Angela Zold

      Total Living Concept


      Saturday December 7, 2019 9:35am - 10:25am
      Meeting Room: Deer 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      9:35am

      Why Voting Is Important To Me
      Limited Capacity seats available

      Why voting is important to me is because I was unable to vote independently and privately the first 40 years of my voting experience. Now because of the Help America Vote Act, I can vote independently and privately and have done so since 2010.

      Presenters

      Saturday December 7, 2019 9:35am - 10:25am
      Meeting Room: Quail 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      10:45am

      Benefits of Elementary Student Involvement in the IEP Meeting
      Limited Capacity seats available

      Student involvement in Individualized Education Program (IEP) meetings are recognized as part of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), however, student involvement in educational planning often does not occur until the age of transition, if it happens at all. Although there is research documenting the importance of student participation in IEP meetings, there is a gap in research focused on how families are impacted. There are no studies specific to students who are deafblind. The purpose of this presentation is to explore elementary student involvement in educational planning as an auto-ethnographic case study, specifically focused on how early student involvement in educational planning can improve collaboration within the IEP team. The presenter is a parent of two children who are deafblind. She will discuss her personal experiences of involving her children in their IEP meetings at a young age and will discuss findings from the case study of her elementary son's IEP team. Case study data collection involved interviews, observations, and document review. IEP team members (including the student and other family members) were interviewed about their IEP meeting experiences. The study involved observations of the 10-year-old student's IEP meeting and review of IEP related documents. This study is unique because the researcher, as a parent was also a participant in the case study. Presentation of the case study results will be presented from the family perspective.

      Presenters
      avatar for Lanya (Lane) McKittrick

      Lanya (Lane) McKittrick

      Research Analyst, Center on Reinventing Public Education
      Family-Professional Partnerships, Deafblindness, Self-determination


      Saturday December 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:35am
      Meeting Room: Ant 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      10:45am

      Campus Connect: Dual Enrollment Post-Secondary Education for Students with Autism & Intellectual Disabilities, an example from Madison College in WI
      Limited Capacity seats available

      Campus Connect is a dual enrollment program in Madison, Wisconsin at Madison Area Technical College for students with intellectual disabilities (ID) and autism. The program is a coordination between the Madison Metro School District and Madison Area Technical College with 40 students. Campus Connect is a fully inclusive college program for students with disabilities seeking both non-degree certification and 2 year degree certificates. Learn about the Madison WI school district and Madison Area Technical College partnership and development of the program, and how to increase college opportunities for students with disabilities between 18-21 years old in high school transition programs.

      Presenters
      avatar for Eric Hartz

      Eric Hartz

      Post Secondary Coordinator, Madison Metro School District
      Dr. Hartz is the Coordinator and lead teacher for the Campus Connect Program for the Madison Metro School District. Campus Connect is a dual enrollment program at Madison College for students with disabilities who require beyond reasonable accommodations in college. He has been specializing... Read More →


      Saturday December 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:35am
      Meeting Room: Quail 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      10:45am

      Capacity Building for Inclusion in Day and Overnight Camps
      Limited Capacity seats available

      Keshet is a national leader in facilitating inclusive camping opportunities where campers with disabilities participate to the greatest possible extent in the full camp experience. Campers with and without disabilities do all camp activities together, eat together and, at overnight camp, live together. With Keshet support, kids, teens and young adults with disabilities thrive at day and overnight camps. Whether learning a new swim stroke or participating in a talent show, camp provides the ideal setting for campers to grow, learn, socialize and of course, have fun. Keshet at camp sets the stage for lifelong memories and friendships. Learn how to create an inclusive environment from registration and training staff to adapting activities and schedules.

      Presenters
      avatar for Jennifer Phillips

      Jennifer Phillips

      Keshet Director of Recreation and Camp Chi Inclusion Coordinator, Keshet
      Jennifer Phillips is an accomplished special education professional with more then 25 years in the field. She has extensive experience as an administrator, trainer, consultant and direct service provider. Her current position is the Director of Recreation and Programming at Keshet... Read More →


      Saturday December 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:35am
      Meeting Room: Horse 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      10:45am

      Comparing Instructional Strategies Teaching Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities Time Management Skills
      Limited Capacity seats available

      An adapted alternating treatment design will be used to examine the effects of two instructional strategies used to teach time management skills with students with intellectual disability. In additions to instructional strategies, effects of smart technology will also be examined. Results of the study will be discussed as well as future implications. Perceptions of society may change as individuals with intellectual disability become more independent. As time management skills improve, self-determination may increase across home, work, and school settings.

      Presenters
      avatar for Karl Wennerlind

      Karl Wennerlind

      Associate Director, Project FOCUS at UNLV


      Saturday December 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:35am
      Meeting Room: Eagle 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      10:45am

      How to Connect Peer Mentorship and Transition Service in Special Education
      Limited Capacity seats available

      Transitions have been improved by partnering students with and without disabilities in reciprocal learning relationships at Empire High in Tucson, Arizona. The use of peer mentorship has demonstrated successful outcomes in post K-12 education and employment for all students involved. Learn how one school has redefined norms in inclusive education by using peer mentorship from video interviews with peer mentors (including students with extensive support needs) and educators.

      Presenters
      avatar for Sarah Robison

      Sarah Robison

      Doctoral Student, University of Arizona
      Second year doctoral student at the University of Arizona. Majoring in Peer Mentorship and minoring in Transition. Very passionate about inclusion, peer mentoring, and transition services.


      Saturday December 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:35am
      Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 2 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      10:45am

      Inclusion Across the Lifespan and Community Impact: Everyone Wins!
      Limited Capacity seats available

      Young people with disabilities who are included in their schools and communities alongside their nondisabled peers are more likely to lead inclusive lives as adults. As family members and allies of the disability community, we believe it is our obligation to foster an inclusive mindset and expectation within our society. Our presentation will discuss what inclusion looks like from infancy to adulthood, with a special emphasis on the inclusion of social roles, behaviors, personality, the value of high expectations, wants and needs, the importance of expecting and including the WHOLE person in decision-making, teaching, and caregiving, and how this all affects people with disabilities, their communities, and vice versa.

      Presenters
      avatar for Adiba Nelson

      Adiba Nelson

      Founder/President, RocketChair Productions
      avatar for Raquel Rosa

      Raquel Rosa

      Representative Payee Project Analyst, National Disability Rights Network
      Raquel is the eldest sibling of a young man who has cerebral palsy. Her career as an advocate for disability justice began 17 years ago, providing direct supports to adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. In 2010, she co-founded DC Metro Sibs, the Washington, DC-based... Read More →


      Saturday December 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:35am
      Meeting Room: Deer 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      10:45am

      Keeping Free Choice Inclusive: Structuring Free Choice Time
      Limited Capacity seats available

      This presentation highlights the challenges that can be associated in implementing free choice activities in inclusive settings for young children with autism if providers are not focused on ensuring children remain actively engaged and making choices. As we work to develop high quality early learning experiences for young children with autism, providers must ensure that the time spent in inclusive settings provides intensive and targeted intervention based on the child's unique learning needs. The presenters will provide specific strategies to ensure the children are engaged in meaningful learning activities while maximizing the student-directed learning opportunities of free choice time.

      Presenters
      JB

      Jennifer Buchter

      Professor, Eastern Illinois University


      Saturday December 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:35am
      Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 3 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      10:45am

      Perspectives on Inclusion Across General and Special Education Preservice Teachers
      Limited Capacity seats available

      While the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act has ensured the rights of students with disabilities to a free and appropriate education in the least restrictive environment over the last 40 years, our education system continues to struggle to effectively provide these students, including those who have significant support needs, with an education in classrooms alongside their same-age peers without disabilities. Efforts to improve the quality and effectiveness of inclusive education include changes to State teacher credentialing requirements and subsequently teacher preparation programs. For example, the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing recently adopted new general education teacher performance expectations in Fall 2017 that increased what general education teachers are required to know and do with regard to meeting the needs of students with disabilities in their classrooms. In response, faculty in the special education, single subject and multiple subject credential programs at California State University, Sacramento collaborated to make changes to their respective programs to improve training in inclusive practices. These revisions include the integration of foundational knowledge of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and Multi-Tiered Systems of Support (MTSS) into initial credential coursework and the creation of an advanced course to be taken by general and special education preservice teachers together. This course focuses on strategies specific to serving all students in their least restrictive environment with an emphasis on co-planning, co-teaching, problem solving, social-emotional learning, differentiated instruction, roles and responsibilities of special and general education teachers, peer mediated learning strategies, assistive technology, adaptations, accommodations, and modifications of standards and learning outcomes for students with disabilities. This presentation will share the preliminary findings of a multi-year project exploring the beliefs, attitudes, concerns and self-efficacy of general and special education preservice teachers with regard to inclusive education and how these may change over time as the preservice teachers experience coursework and instruction on evidence-based interventions and instructional strategies to create safe and caring, culturally responsive classroom communities. Specifically, the focus will be on the data from surveys completed by one year's cohorts of preservice general and special educators at the beginning, middle and end of their credential programs. Insights and implications for preservice general and special education teacher preparation will be discussed. This research session directly aligns with the 2019 Conference theme, "Building Diverse and Inclusive Communities." In particular, the session seeks to share the diverse perspectives of preservice general and special educators with regard to inclusive education and to inform teacher preparation programs about providing future general and special educators with key dispositions, knowledge and skills in order to provide equitable and inclusive educational opportunities to all students.

      Presenters
      avatar for Jean Gonsier-Gerdin

      Jean Gonsier-Gerdin

      Professor, Teaching Credentials-Special Education, California State University, Sacramento


      Saturday December 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:35am
      Meeting Room: Rattlesnake 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      10:45am

      Shifting Roles During Transition: Who's in the Driver's Seat?
      Limited Capacity seats available

      Self-determination means finding and using your voice to lead your own life, no matter how you communicate. Becoming self-determined is essential for all transitioning youth, however it can be difficult to achieve if the adults involved remain in the same caretaker and decision-maker roles they've played since the children were younger. It's important that parents learn to adapt their roles and shift to being supporters of autonomy, empowerment and inclusion. Come to this session to hear a self-advocate's and two parents' personal stories and lessons learned on their transition journeys. Presenters will also share innovative ideas and strategies from their transition work with families and youth with disabilities at the parent training and information centers (PTIs) in Colorado and Arizona.

      Presenters

      Saturday December 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:35am
      Meeting Room: Buzzard 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      10:45am

      Supporting Agencies and Systems to Dream!
      Limited Capacity seats available

      Within human services, much emphasis has been placed on offering people served by the system opportunities to dream, to create their future, and to be persistent in pursuits of happiness and fulfillment, And rightfully so, but what support is offered to direct supporters, managers and directors to engage in similar conversations regarding their organizational and system directions? Often, this is a missed opportunity to engage in inclusive dialogue regarding the future of our work. Over the past 25+ years, the team at Networks for Training and Development, Inc. has facilitated well over 100 strategic plans for agencies, systems, and many other groups. This session will highlight the highly interactive and exciting process of working with large groups, and encouraging them to dream big!

      Presenters
      avatar for Shauna Roman

      Shauna Roman

      Executive Director, Networks for Training and Development, Inc.
      Shauna is passionate about value-based leadership, strategic planning, and applying adult learning principles in all areas of her work. She has been involved in varying ways with people with disabilities, their families, and supporters to increase understanding, provide support, and... Read More →


      Saturday December 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:35am
      Meeting Room: Scorpion 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      10:45am

      Universal Design for Learning (UDL): Access & Agency for ALL Learners
      Limited Capacity seats available

      Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is a framework for learning based on neuroscience research that recognizes the ways ALL learners vary in how they engage with the world, how they make meaning of it, and how they interact with ideas, materials and each other. The framework scaffolds educators to anticipate and pro-actively design for this learner variability. UDL isn't about changing the learner; it's about changing the curriculum. It's about access — designing so all learners can "reach" the learning, and it's about agency-designing so all learners become expert learners — purposeful and motivated, strategic and goal-directed, resourceful and knowledgeable. The overall goal of this session is to provide participants with an understanding of UDL that is solid enough to serve as a foundation for continued learning. (And we will have fun — a few good laughs are guaranteed.)

      Presenters
      avatar for Susan Shapiro

      Susan Shapiro

      Implementation Specialist, CAST
      The last time I presented at TASH was about twenty-five (25) years ago. My session was titled, "What HOT in Regular Education". I talked with special educators about what was happening in general education classrooms (e.g. cooperative learning, writer's workshop). I'm not the world's... Read More →


      Saturday December 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:35am
      Meeting Room: Gila-Monster 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      10:45am

      What Does It Take to Prepare Teachers for Inclusive Practices?
      Limited Capacity seats available

      Research findings demonstrate that general education (inclusive) classrooms provide the best context for learning (Jackson, Ryndak and White, 2013) for students with significant disabilities. To build diverse and inclusive communities, Delano, Perner and Keefe (2008/2009) recommend that teacher preparation programs shape teacher candidates' philosophies, dispositions, practice, and skills with a focus on access to the general curriculum in inclusive contexts. The purpose of this research was to understand how faculty focusing on special education for students with significant disabilities prepare teachers to provide special education services in inclusive settings. Study participants were expert faculty from Institutes of Higher Education (IHEs) in the US who prepared teachers to work with students with significant disabilities in inclusive, general education contexts. We conducted a Delphi study (Hsu and Sandford, 2007) to gather consensus on best practices in teacher preparation to include students with significant disabilities. Iterative survey results and implications for research, practice and policy will be shared.

      Presenters
      avatar for Jennifer Kurth

      Jennifer Kurth

      Associate Professor, University of Kansas
      Inclusive Education
      avatar for Virginia Walker

      Virginia Walker

      Assistant Professor, Department of Special Education and Child Development, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
      Virginia L. Walker, PhD, BCBA-D, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Special Education and Child Development at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Dr. Walker began her career as a special education teacher of students with extensive support needs in Atlanta... Read More →


      Saturday December 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:35am
      Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 1 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      10:45am

      What Matters and Why: Stakeholder Voices to Improve Communication Intervention
      Limited Capacity seats available

      Although substantial strides have been made to develop effective interventions to improve outcomes for children and youth who have complex communication needs (i.e., unable to use verbal speech to meet daily communication needs), a well-documented research-to-practice gap remains. A number of different factors influence this research-to-practice gap, with issues related to social validity likely being among the most important. Social validity involves the significance of intervention goals, acceptability of procedures, and impact of outcomes, as perceived by key stakeholders' such as parents and family members, educators, service providers, and children themselves. To bridge the research-to-practice gap and ensure that interventions are both effective and socially valid (e.g., acceptable, significant), concerted efforts must be made to understand and address the perspectives of diverse stakeholders. Doing so can increase the likelihood that research-based interventions actually make a sustained and meaningful impact on the lives of children and youth in real schools and communities. In this presentation, we will share the aim, method, findings, and implications from research focused on engaging diverse stakeholders to understand their perspectives on the significance, acceptability, and impact of interventions for children and youth with complex communication needs. Our work directly relates to this year's theme "Building Diverse and Inclusive Communities" because we recognize that developing and implementing interventions that actually make an impact on children's communication access, opportunity to thrive, and inclusion in their schools and communities must include input from the unique perspectives and experiences of diverse stakeholders.

      Presenters
      avatar for Elizabeth Biggs

      Elizabeth Biggs

      Assistant Professor, Vanderbilt University
      Elizabeth E. Biggs, PhD is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Special Education at Vanderbilt University. She started working with students with intellectual and developmental disabilities as a special education teacher on the Navajo Nation in New Mexico and has worked extensively... Read More →


      Saturday December 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:35am
      Meeting Room: Roadrunner 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

      1:09pm

      About Breakout Sessions
      Breakout Presentations are delivered in assigned meeting rooms for 50 minutes.

        Saturday December 7, 2019 1:09pm - 4:10pm
        Sheraton Grand at Wild Horse Pass 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        1:10pm

        A Systematic Review of Employers' Perspectives of Employed Individuals with IDD
        Limited Capacity seats available

        Researchers have shown high rates of un- and under-employment among individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), including those with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and intellectual disability (ID). For instance, 26.3% of individuals with ID (Kraus et al., 2018) and 14% of individuals with ASD (Roux et al., 2017) were competitively employed relative to 68.6% of individuals without IDD in 2016. While intervention has historically occurred at the individual level by promoting job skills, we believe to improve sustainable employment outcomes, it is imperative to take an ecological systems approach by intervening from both demand-side (employer) and supply-side (employee). That is, employers can play a significant role in creating change to support a more cohesive, diverse, and inclusive community for employees with IDD. In order to provide employment opportunities for people with IDD, we must better understand how we can support employers' perspectives and knowledge. As such, the purpose of this systematic review was to aggregate studies which addressed the perspectives of employers on individuals with IDD working in integrated employments settings. With this information, we will provide an overall picture of the employers' perspectives literature and will summarize outcomes of the studies. Implications for future practice and research will be included.

        Presenters
        avatar for Lindsay Athamanah

        Lindsay Athamanah

        Assistant Professor, University of Missouri - St. Louis


        Saturday December 7, 2019 1:10pm - 2:00pm
        Meeting Room: Coyote 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        1:10pm

        Bathroom Privacy IS Exclusive
        Limited Capacity seats available

        The presentation will provide a framework of how an idea went through the legislative process and became law. In February of 2019, a grassroots movement was born in Arizona when stories of having to change individuals with disabilities on the floors of public bathrooms were shared. Many families and providers opt to stay at home, isolating themselves from their communities, rather than endure such degrading and unclean options for their bathroom needs. A solution could be to have a changing table that is appropriate for all sizes in a bathroom that follows ADA guidelines for access and is also open for use by all genders. A core leadership formed, to take on this issue of lack of inclusion in the community due to the inequality of privacy and dignity in a bathroom at the state legislative level. Even though the disability community is the largest minority population in the U.S., once again their human and civil rights are ignored at the utmost basic level due to a body function that every human being experiences, eliminating waste. The presentation, bathroom privacy IS exclusive intersects with the theme at TASH for 2019 on all aspects. By sharing the methods the leadership used to lead this grassroots movement and get a law passed, those attending our presentation can go back to their communities and follow the shared model. Agents for change can be born who will return to their cities and towns and push for full inclusion and participation for individuals with disabilities in their communities. Our presentation will show how through advocacy efforts, those with disabilities will not be treated as second rate citizens any longer and will not be discriminated against while in the bathroom. Privacy and dignity should be afforded to all individuals using a restroom in the community, by requiring universal changing areas.


        Saturday December 7, 2019 1:10pm - 2:00pm
        Meeting Room: Scorpion 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        1:10pm

        Building an Evidence Base in the Field of Deafblindness
        Limited Capacity seats available

        This session will describe the existing literature in the field of deafblindness and the importance of conducting further high-quality research to identify evidence-based practices (EBPs). There is little current, well-developed research that meets requirements of quality research designs as specified by the What Works Clearinghouse for this population, which has led to the use of instructional strategies with limited empirical support with children with the most intensive support needs for participation in all activities and settings. Three distinct studies focused on children with impairments in both vision and hearing were conducted to build the research base informing practice in the field of deafblindness. Results and methodological considerations will be presented for this group of three studies. Implications for practice and future research will be discussed, with attention to how implementation of EBPs help build diverse and inclusive communities by increasing the effectiveness and efficiency with which skills required for full school and community participation are taught.


        Saturday December 7, 2019 1:10pm - 2:00pm
        Meeting Room: Rattlesnake 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        1:10pm

        Courtney's Story Begins with Home
        Limited Capacity seats available

        Courtney is a young woman who belongs to a real community of friends and family in her town in rural Maine. Her connections are not accidental, but the result of intentional and consistent efforts by her family and supporters. In this presentation, Courtney's Mom will share how building community with her daughter started shortly after birth and continues every day. "Community" is not a location, or a place for an outing. Community is a fellowship of people connected by interests, passions, attitudes, and goals.

        Presenters
        avatar for Laurie Kimball

        Laurie Kimball

        Director, KFI South, KFI
        Laurie has made a career of facilitating support for people with disabilities to live real lives and participate in socially valued lifestyles in their communities. Laurie's passions are for positive approaches to challenging behavior, person centered services and building community... Read More →
        avatar for Lyann Grogan

        Lyann Grogan

        Director of Training & Outreach, KFI
        After ten years of working in a segregated Mental Health setting as a Music Therapist at New Hampshire Hospital and serving as a member of the National Music Therapy Association’s Training Committee LyAnn found inspiration. She was inspired by KFI's mission to provide supports... Read More →


        Saturday December 7, 2019 1:10pm - 2:00pm
        Meeting Room: Deer 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        1:10pm

        Developing an Effective Peer Mentor Program in an Inclusive College Setting
        Limited Capacity seats available

        The primary outcome goals of inclusive postsecondary education (IPSE) programs for individuals with IDD include increasing independence (including greater economic success and self-sufficiency), community and employment inclusion, and self-determination skills. Programs set up for student success in an inclusive academic and community setting show that students with IDD benefit from supportive peer mentors (Bloomberg & Daly, 2009). The primary goal of this early stages IPSE program was to set up and implement an effective peer mentor recruitment and training system to support academic and social success for college students with IDD. Successful peer mentoring programs need to include the development and implementation of several key components: a) orientations and faculty training, b) communication systems across stakeholders, c) equal-partnership mentoring, d) high expectations, e) faculty using mentors as resources and finding natural supports in the classroom, f) promoting independence, g) focusing on inclusion, and h) having fun and socializing (Jones & Gobble, 2012). In order to provide these key components, program faculty completed a literature review on successful peer mentoring/tutoring programs. This information was then used to develop a framework for the peer tutoring program. The next step was to develop a systematic program for recruiting and funding quality peer tutors/coaches to aid in academic inclusion in academic courses, as well as volunteer peer mentors to improve social inclusion. Finally, a research-based training program for academic peer tutors and social peer mentors was developed and implemented. The quality and effectiveness of the recruitment and training program was reviewed and evaluated based on participant survey/interview responses, number of successfully implemented training sessions, and program students' responses to the peer tutor/mentor experience based on survey and open-ended interview questions. During the session, program students and peer mentors will share their perspectives on the process. Program staff will share findings of the process as well as next steps.

        Presenters
        avatar for Karl Wennerlind

        Karl Wennerlind

        Associate Director, Project FOCUS at UNLV
        avatar for Stephanie Devine

        Stephanie Devine

        Assistant Professor, Georgia Southern University


        Saturday December 7, 2019 1:10pm - 2:00pm
        Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 2 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        1:10pm

        Family Working Together for Inclusion Through Advocacy
        Limited Capacity seats available

        We will be presenting Alexandra Adlawan, a twenty-five-year-old woman diagnosed with ASD and her family support system. When building anything, it is very important to have a diverse sustainable and adaptable base that will provide solid support. Alexandra Adlawan is an artist/writer/illustrator and animator. As a principal in a family run business, Amazing Artists LLC, she has written and illustrated two children's books in her "THE ADVENTURES OF MADDIE AND ALBERT" series, as well as, written/illustrated/directed and voiced her "INCLUSION" animation video. Alexandra focuses on sharing her art with young children in her community of Long Beach, California. She recently shared her books with 200+ children from K-2 at Cubberley Elementary during Autism Week focusing on "Celebrating Differences". Alexandra has been invited to participate with Long Beach Unified School District during the 2019-2020 school year with more events across the district as LBUSD focus on Inclusion initiative similar to NYC Public Schools Nest Program. Our presentation will share our family's journey from diagnosis to today. Together we are creating an environment where the focus is on achievement and not "the" disability. We will be presenting written as well as audio/video material.

        Presenters
        avatar for Floyd Adlawan

        Floyd Adlawan

        Amazing Artists
        Alexandra Adlawan, Alex for short, is a Long Beach, CA resident who began drawing characters and creating stories in 5th grade. At Gatsby Books in Long Beach, the Millikan High School graduate celebrated the debut of her first children’s book entitled “Wild Imagination: The Adventures... Read More →


        Saturday December 7, 2019 1:10pm - 2:00pm
        Meeting Room: Ant 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        1:10pm

        Functional Skills in the 21st Century: A Conversation
        Limited Capacity seats available

        In 2035, today’s kindergarteners will be 21 and entering adulthood. What type of future should we prepare our students to enter? In this structured conversation, we will begin by tracing the history of curriculum development for students with significant support needs from 1976 to the present. Building on the lessons from the past, we propose a framework for future curriculum decision making based on ethics, evidence, and an acknowledgement that the adult world students of today will eventually encounter will require an unknown set of academic, daily living, community, social, self-determination, and vocational skills. As we consider the path forward in curriculum development, we ask: 1. Why do so many students with significant support needs continue to access curriculum that focuses on narrow life skills, and what types of curriculum decisions could ensure more expansive outcomes? 2. What is the relationship between academics and functional outcomes, and why has “functional” become a dirty word? What do we mean when we say we can blend, balance, or reconcile functional and academic outcomes? (Timberlake; McDonnell) 3. What are the core principles of curriculum development that should remain central decision making? What are our non-negotiables? 4. How do we make sense of the relationship between the form and the function of a particular outcome?

        Presenters
        avatar for Andrea Ruppar

        Andrea Ruppar

        University of Wisconsin-Madison
        avatar for Jennifer Kurth

        Jennifer Kurth

        Associate Professor, University of Kansas
        Inclusive Education


        Saturday December 7, 2019 1:10pm - 2:00pm
        Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 1 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        1:10pm

        Having Fun While Enjoying Inclusive Education, Supported Living and Employment
        Limited Capacity seats available

        Too often people like me, autistic and non-verbal, are excluded from fun experiences. Whether it is in school, at home, or on the job, with proper supports, we can and should be given the opportunity to participate in recreational and leisure activities. With still photography and videos, I will demonstrate how I have been able to enjoy life. I am no longer a student, but I will talk about the fun things I did while in college, for example, going to museums, the race track and Las Vegas. I will also show pictures from cruises I went on and a trip to Cuba. Because I live in my own house, I am able to plan leisure activities in the community. I always like to land on my feet, so I am never going to swim for fun. I also have arthritis and poor balance so sports are out of the question; however, I can enjoy short hikes, going to the beach, movies, the theater, clubs, Dodger games and Disneyland. My microenterprise gives me the opportunity to enjoy spending time with Becky, my micro-enterprise consultant, and Michelle, my job coach. Relationships like that are extremely awesome. I will talk about what supports are needed to make all of these experiences happen.

        Presenters
        avatar for Sue Rubin

        Sue Rubin

        CEO, Sue Rubin Consulting
        Sue Rubin, owner and CEO of Sue Rubin Consulting provides autism-related presentations and consultation for a variety of audiences.  Sue is a graduate of Whittier College, a published author, has been the subject of two public television documentaries along with authoring and being... Read More →
        avatar for Rita Rubin

        Rita Rubin

        Besides being Sue's mom, I was on the Board of our local chapter of the Autism Society for 30 years, 14 as President.and also served on several other Boards re: disabilities. I am a "Master Trainer" of Facilitated Communication and serve on the Board of REACH.


        Saturday December 7, 2019 1:10pm - 2:00pm
        Meeting Room: Horse 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        1:10pm

        Inclusive Post Secondary Education: The Longing to Belong in Higher Education
        Limited Capacity seats available

        This session will discuss how an inclusive post secondary initiative built capacity for inclusion, natural supports and belonging on a college campus. By sharing experiences and stories we will provide insights on how to enhance the capacity of campus communities to create inclusive campus communities where students develop a sense of belonging that contributes to their success in college and beyond. Belonging is a critical and basic human need that we often take for granted. It is imperative to the development of one's independence, self-advocacy, participation, and the development of a sense of purpose in life.

        Presenters

        Saturday December 7, 2019 1:10pm - 2:00pm
        Meeting Room: Gila-Monster 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        1:10pm

        Inclusive Postsecondary Education: Experiences from those who live it!
        Limited Capacity seats available

        While typical students graduate high school after 4 years and transition to work or higher education, these options are historically not available to students with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). The University of Arizona's College of Education in collaboration with local school districts provide a unique fully inclusive postsecondary transition option for young adults, age 18-22 who have IDD. Project FOCUS (Focusing Opportunities with Community and University Support) facilitates access and inclusion to the University of Arizona's academic courses, internship experiences, and college life events in order to increase each student's independence, quality of life, and employability. A student in Project FOCUS will present about their experience transitioning from high school to higher education, attending college, and receiving employment training. A same-aged undergraduate peer mentor will present on how they foster self-determination of students with IDD to build a more diverse and inclusive university community.

        Presenters
        avatar for Colleen Middleton

        Colleen Middleton

        Coordinator, Project FOCUS
        avatar for Stephanie MacFarland

        Stephanie MacFarland

        University of Arizona


        Saturday December 7, 2019 1:10pm - 2:00pm
        Meeting Room: Quail 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        1:10pm

        Letting Grow: Parent Involvement Strategies for Transition Sucess
        Limited Capacity seats available

        It is widely recognized that while the parent role changes, it does not end, and effective ongoing family engagement leads to more positive post-school outcomes for youth with significant disabilities. Balancing the need for parents to be appropriately involved while promoting the youth' s self-determination and independence often poses challenges for families as well as programs and service providers. In this interactive session presented from the parent point of view, participants will hear parent-to-parent tips for transitioning from IEP team member and lead advocate to a supporting, yet vital role as the parent of a young adult. Learn about effective parent involvement practices and explore age-and-stage appropriate ways to encourage young adults' growth in autonomy and self-determination.

        Presenters

        Saturday December 7, 2019 1:10pm - 2:00pm
        Meeting Room: Buzzard 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        1:10pm

        Preschool Inclusion: Small Wins
        Limited Capacity seats available

        In states where preschool is not funded, schools must overcome enormous odds to offer inclusive placements for their children with disabilities. This presentation will share the data around inclusion for the state of Arizona, its efforts to bring awareness of the benefits of offering inclusive programming within its schools and districts, and ultimately some of the successes it is currently experiencing. Representatives from schools, programs and State Dept. of Ed., will share insights and tips that have improved opportunities for children and families.

        Presenters
        avatar for Suzanne Perry

        Suzanne Perry

        619 Coordinator and Director of Early Childhood Special Education, Arizona Department of Education
        Preschool Inclusion, Early Childhood Outcomes, Preschool Transitions, Autism, IDEA
        avatar for Shara Rose

        Shara Rose

        ESS Coordinator, Dysart Unified School District #89
        ESS Coordinator with the Dysart Unified School District


        Saturday December 7, 2019 1:10pm - 2:00pm
        Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 3 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        1:10pm

        Research that Empowers People with Disabilities
        Limited Capacity seats available

        This research uses narrative methodology through a disability studies lens by utilizing the voices of adults on the autism spectrum in order to best understand their needs and desires as they transition to adulthood. The current academic literature uses the medical model of disability to emphasize the perceived deficits in skill acquisition that are hindering adults diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) to successfully take part in many aspects of adulthood. This research uses the social construct of disability to offer a different perspective on the needs, supports, and services for adults on the spectrum as they transition into adulthood. It demonstrates the role that society plays in perpetuating a disability and offers insights on how we can better adapt to different needs, rather than putting the burden of responsibility on the person with ASD. Furthermore, this presentation will focus on the process and procedures of research practices that ensure that the most important stakeholders, those with disabilities, have their voices heard. This research is co-constructed by the researcher and research participant, with the researcher spending several years to gain the research participant's trust and learn his story.

        Presenters

        Saturday December 7, 2019 1:10pm - 2:00pm
        Meeting Room: Eagle 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        1:10pm

        The Conundrum of a Lost But Not Forgotten Communicative Method
        Limited Capacity seats available

        While the use of facilitated communication grows, there is minimal research of the method being done. Past research has leaned towards "disclaiming" the method, yet the practice of the method persists. The question of why the practice continues, and what can be done about this quandary is explored in this workshop. Guided by documents including emails, presentations, and unpublished research, the workshop aims to implement an unobstructed discussion of this conundrum. This method is the only means of communication for some, and is too often swept under the rug. If this discussion cannot be held at TASH, the question is, where can it be held? The discussion will be guided by four questions; 1. What prior experiences have researchers in this area had? 2. What outcomes can newer researchers expect from work in this area? 3. If freedom of research is stifled, how does society expect to grow? 4. Where can users of the method turn to learn best practice, be accepted, and grow in skill?

        Presenters
        avatar for Aja McKee

        Aja McKee

        Assistant Professor, California State University, Fullerton (CSUF)
        Dr. Aja McKee is an Assistant Professor at California State University, Fullerton (CSUF) in the Department of Special Education. She has worked in the public education system since 1998. Her work as a special educator and administrator provides her with practical experience she shares... Read More →


        Saturday December 7, 2019 1:10pm - 2:00pm
        Meeting Room: Roadrunner 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        2:15pm

        10 Basic Financial Steps for Special Needs Caregivers
        Limited Capacity seats available

        There are some needs that will always be present and they must be carefully considered and planned for appropriately. This workshop addresses such critical issues as applying for government benefits for Social Security and Medicaid, creating a Special Needs Trust, the importance of a Will and considering a Letter of Intent. Taking these 10 basic steps now can help ensure the type of care and quality of life for a loved one's well-being today and tomorrow.


        Saturday December 7, 2019 2:15pm - 3:05pm
        Meeting Room: Buzzard 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        2:15pm

        Building the Inclusive Village
        Limited Capacity seats available

        Inclusion does not just happen magically. It requires social change, opportunity, and a receptive and nurturing environment to grow. It does not just take a Village — it takes an Inclusive Village to bring the change we need. This presentation explores ways of building that Inclusive Village through community-based activities and discusses how we all play an important role in creating the change we need to make in our local communities. Topics covered include finding the right community partners, creating true peer friendships, combating inspirational porn with high but achievable standards, and working to provide an inclusive option to all recreational opportunities. A demonstration of inclusive dance will be provided.


        Saturday December 7, 2019 2:15pm - 3:05pm
        Meeting Room: Roadrunner 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        2:15pm

        Everybody's Invited - Inclusion in Afterschool Programs and Summer Camp
        Limited Capacity seats available

        Inclusion does not end with the school day. Children want to participate and be included in recreation programs, and their families want to be a part of the general community. This includes summer camp, afterschool programs, and so much more. We will be sharing our experience in transforming our programs into inclusive settings and making them work for all families. What started as a summer camp pilot program is now spreading throughout our community center. We have built a fully inclusive camp experience for all families and now offer inclusion supports for our afterschool program. The word is out and the families want in - in on the fun, in on the unique experiences camp and afterschool provide, and in on the memories of their children being included.

        Presenters

        Saturday December 7, 2019 2:15pm - 3:05pm
        Meeting Room: Deer 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        2:15pm

        Exploring Employment Support: Using Data to Inform Effective Practice
        Limited Capacity seats available

        Join this conversation to learn and share ideas about key metrics for promoting effective employment supports and outcomes for job seekers with intellectual disabilities. Using data from a pulse daily survey of employment specialists, we will examine key metrics through the lenses of what supports were provided, who was involved, and where supports were delivered based on a comprehensive model of employment supports. Walk away with new ideas about using data to reflect on employment support practices, address challenges, and improve outcomes for job seekers with disabilities.

        Presenters
        avatar for John Butterworth

        John Butterworth

        Institute for Community Inclusion
        avatar for Kelly Nye-Lengerman

        Kelly Nye-Lengerman

        Research Associate, University of Minnesota


        Saturday December 7, 2019 2:15pm - 3:05pm
        Meeting Room: Coyote 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        2:15pm

        Fostering Friendships for All Abilities in All Activities
        Limited Capacity seats available

        Building a Diverse and Inclusive Community is an on-going mission across the country, especially when it comes to individuals with developmental disabilities. The TIES Program was created for this reason. By providing support to individuals who have developmental disabilities with the natural support of a trained peer volunteer, our society is recognizing the importance of inclusion. TIES (Together Including Every Student), a program of Starbridge, promotes the participation of students and young adults who have developmental disabilities in inclusive, organized, extracurricular and community activities, with the support of trained peer volunteers. TIES volunteers provide natural support to TIES participants during these activities, and in return, are rewarded in knowing they are making a difference in someone's life while creating community and having the opportunity to enjoy an activity with someone that they may have not had the opportunity previously. Peer volunteers are students in grades 8-12. After completing an application, volunteers go through a training and then are paired with participants based on mutual interests, personal attributes and availability. Participants are children and young adults between the ages of 8-21 who have developmental disabilities. Participants can join any activities of their choice with the natural support of a peer volunteer They can join clubs and athletic events at their school, school dances and proms, activities at their Parks and Recreation Department, YMCA, exercise in their school and community and basically anything based upon choice and interest. The TIES Coordinator collaborates with the participant and their family to develop an individualized support plan to guide the peer volunteer's support.

        Presenters
        avatar for Kathy Costello

        Kathy Costello

        TIES Program Director, Starbridge
        TIES (Together Including Every Student) provides opportunities to students and young adults who have developmental disabilities in inclusive extracurricular, recreational and community activities with the support of trained peer volunteers.


        Saturday December 7, 2019 2:15pm - 3:05pm
        Meeting Room: Horse 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        2:15pm

        General Educators' Perspectives on Inclusive Education and Implementing Student Supports
        Limited Capacity seats available

        There is a critical need to ensure students with significant disabilities have access to the general education curriculum within inclusive classrooms. All team members contribute to the education and supports for students with significant disabilities. General education teachers play a particularly important role in fostering an inclusive classroom environment and making curriculum accessible to all students. However, there is minimal existing research that has investigated the perspectives of general education teachers. The purpose of this study was to understand general educators' perspectives of inclusive education, including how they learned about the strategies they used to support students with significant disabilities in their classrooms. We held five focus groups with 16 general education teachers at two fully inclusive elementary schools. Results from this study may lead to an understanding of the important aspects involved in supporting general educators to implement inclusive practices. The content of this presentation is important for building diverse and inclusive communities because it gathers the perspectives of general education teachers who teach in inclusive schools; such perspectives have been rarely investigated in the existing research on this topic. This information may be useful as the field works to advance inclusive education and ensure teachers are knowledgeable and prepared to support the diverse learning needs of students in their classrooms.

        Presenters
        avatar for Alison Zagona

        Alison Zagona

        Assistant Professor, University of New Mexico
        I am an Assistant Professor at the University of New Mexico, and I am the co-Chair of the TASH Early Career Researcher Network. My research is focused on inclusive education and instructional, social, and behavior supports for students with complex support needs. I am also passionate... Read More →
        avatar for Kirsten Lansey

        Kirsten Lansey

        Doctoral Student, University of Arizona
        avatar for Jennifer Kurth

        Jennifer Kurth

        Associate Professor, University of Kansas
        Inclusive Education


        Saturday December 7, 2019 2:15pm - 3:05pm
        Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 1 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        2:15pm

        Implementing Transitions in K-14 Settings
        Limited Capacity seats available

        This proposal will discuss the importance of implementing transition strategies from the earliest grades through post-secondary settings. Research has pointed out the need to increase retention in school, especially for those living in poverty and/or those with a disability (Pace & Garcia, 2016). Strategies for increasing student success in school from early elementary through post-secondary setting will be discussed.

        Presenters
        avatar for Amy Williamson

        Amy Williamson

        CrossingPoints Program Coordinator, The Unviersity of Alabama
        Amy Williamson, Ph.D., currently serves as the CrossingPoints Program Coordinator at The University of Alabama. She has worked with young adults with intellectual disabilities for over 15 years, both through the education system as well as other community based programing. Dr. Williamson’s... Read More →


        Saturday December 7, 2019 2:15pm - 3:05pm
        Meeting Room: Eagle 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        2:15pm

        Improving Person-Centered Planning and Thinking in Increasingly Diverse Communities
        Limited Capacity seats available

        The United States (US) is a diverse country, becoming increasingly diverse over time. As members of culturally diverse communities and all communities, people with disabilities must be able to choose the communities to which they belong and to be truly a part of those communities. This requires that we begin by listening to people with disabilities and understanding what they want for their lives. Many people with disabilities rely on formal supports systems that have been changing over the past 30 years. Systems which historically offered narrowly defined supports had the deleterious effect of pulling people from their communities and cultural traditions. These systems have seen an emerging shift to embrace person-centered principles. This change is premised on the belief that people should have the authority to define and pursue their own vision of a good life. Just as the US is diverse, the approaches that states, tribes, and territories take to adopt person-centered practices in disability systems vary. Although person-centered supports are generally accepted as best practice, their full realization has been hard to achieve despite decades of work by stakeholders; evidence supporting person-centered practices; guidance from federal agencies; and legislation. Recently the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, however, issued regulations requiring person-centered planning and have identified person-centered planning as being an essential element of high-quality long-term services and supports program. As support systems work towards the full implementation of person-centered planning, they must be careful to respect cultural and linguistic needs so that a common definition of person-centeredness can be espoused. This definition, as well as the resulting formal planning practices, must dignify people s lived experiences within their communities and not impose any undue barriers on any group of people seeking supports. The National Center on Advancing Person Centered Practices and Systems (NCAPPS) is assisting states, tribes, and territories to transform their support systems and implement policy on person-centered thinking, planning, and practices. The center is seeking to do this in a way that recognizes the unique lens that people from a variety of cultural backgrounds bring to the picture. To this end, NCAPPS is working with a broad range of national partners as well as advocates with disabilities or other lived experiences. This presentation will involve an interactive discussion about the work of NCAPPS and the goals of responsibly promoting policies and practices that represent diverse needs and interests, some that may seem at odds with others. The NCAPPS team will present an overview current practice and key themes of NCAPPS work with states, describe the role of people with lived experience in the process, provide an overview of stakeholder engagement activities, and discuss how these various activities are guiding the Centers activities. The session will conclude with a facilitated discussion about how NCAPPS can better promote cultural and linguistic diversity through its work and navigate conflicts and barriers related to respecting diversity.

        Presenters

        Saturday December 7, 2019 2:15pm - 3:05pm
        Meeting Room: Ant 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        2:15pm

        Inclusive Education: Inclusive Success with Community Supports
        Limited Capacity seats available

        Inclusive education has always been the goal for my children since learning about it through Partners in Policymaking seminars. This presentation will share insights to successful inclusion across their educational careers starting from preschool to high school. Recent success in a private school inclusive setting with my son has shown that community supports are not only critical to the student, but offer intangible benefits to the community in which they live.


        Saturday December 7, 2019 2:15pm - 3:05pm
        Meeting Room: Rattlesnake 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        2:15pm

        Person Centered Planning and Assistive Technology: Promoting Inclusive Education
        Limited Capacity seats available

        Assistive technology holds the promise of increased opportunities for students with severe disabilities to be educated in general education settings and attain inclusive lifestyles. IDEA requires that consideration of assistive technology must be a part of the Individualized Education Program. Too often the environment and tasks considered in identifying the appropriate devices for students are self-contained settings. This session describes a person centered planning process taught to teachers and families that promotes the identification of assistive technology in inclusive education classrooms.

        Presenters
        avatar for Craig Miner

        Craig Miner

        Professor, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville


        Saturday December 7, 2019 2:15pm - 3:05pm
        Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 3 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        2:15pm

        Social Capital: The New Inclusion
        Limited Capacity seats available

        "You are the sum total of the people you meet and interact within the world. Whether it’s your family, peers, or co-workers the opportunities you have and the things you learn all come through doors that other people open for you." —Tanner Colby

        We will present how SEEC has strategically utilized the concepts of social capital to foster diverse relationships and develop opportunities for 22 people with intellectual disabilities to thrive in their own home. This workshop will provide the audience with the concepts and tools to intentionally use social capital in helping build a robust life for people with intellectual disabilities.


        Saturday December 7, 2019 2:15pm - 3:05pm
        Meeting Room: Scorpion 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        2:15pm

        The College Search: Tips and Tools for Students and Families
        Limited Capacity seats available

        Think College Search is the only centralized source of information on higher education options for students with ID. The online database includes information on over 75 variables and the development was guided by the Think College Standards for Inclusive Higher Education (Grigal, Hart, & Weir, 2011). The database was initially developed through a national survey of 149 inclusive postsecondary education programs (see Grigal, Hart, & Weir, 2012 for a review of methods). The database was revised and relaunched in 2017, with updated information provided by over 260 programs. The recommendations and resources to be provided in this session were developed based on direct input from college students with ID and their families, as well as our experience supporting students and families to use College Search. For more than 10 years, Think College has supported students, families, and professionals to learn more about college options. Through the questions that students and families have asked us and the feedback that they have provided to us, we have gained a wealth of knowledge of what it takes to find the right college. In this session, we present an overview of Think College Search and related resources that are available to support students and families in the college search process. Conducting a college search is a daunting task for any student and their family, but students with ID may have factors to consider in addition to the typical features of a college. We provide a summary of characteristics of college programs and give a detailed list of questions that student and families should ask as they research options. We will also share a tool to do a basic side-by-side comparison of programs and strategies for getting the most out of a campus visit or open house. By understanding the availability of options and the practices being used to support students with ID to access academic, residential, and employment experiences on college campuses, students and families will develop a better understanding of higher education options, and what characteristics matter most to them. The information provided will also be highly relevant to transition professionals who can use the resources and knowledge provided to share with students and families and support them in the college search process. This session is designed specifically for families and students, and has direct relevance to this audience, particularly those who are planning to conduct a college search. It will also have relevance to colleges and universities in terms of seeing how the information they share publicly through the Think College website and their own webpages shape public perception of their program, and perhaps lead to ideas for improvement in those areas. Other agencies will learn how to use Think College Search and can share those strategies with their stakeholders as well. The college search tools that will be shared and discussed in the session have been developed in consultation with parents and students. Some of the tools have been used by dozens of families and students over the past few years, and edits and additions have been made based on their input. We will also show and describe new web-based tools that have recently been added based on input from students and families.

        Presenters
        avatar for Cate Weir

        Cate Weir

        Project Director, Think College
        I am the director of the Think College National Coordinating Center, focusing on inclusive postsecondary education for students with intellectual disabilities.


        Saturday December 7, 2019 2:15pm - 3:05pm
        Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 2 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        3:20pm

        AbleVoices: Photography for Self-Expression, Empowerment, and Advocacy
        Limited Capacity seats available

        I will provide some background about myself and how photography helped my son (who has a disability and is non-verbal) communicate. I am an educator and a photographer and also a disability advocate. I am on the board of The Arc Tennessee, a graduate of the Partners in Policymaking Leadership Institute (a program of the TN Council on Developmental Disabilities), and a founding member of WCS Link (a special needs parent group that works closely with Williamson County School Student Support Services administration to provide support to families in the district). I combine my teaching, photography, and advocacy skills to teach photography to Transition II students in Williamson County School as a means of self-expression, empowerment, and advocacy for these individuals. I will present research-based evidence to answer the question: Why photography for students with disabilities? (both viewing and making photographs).... photography is a flexible and accessible medium, it is a good activity for our bodies and brains (stimulating), it helps individuals develop new skills, it is a powerful vehicle for communication, it can help build relationships (both peer and teacher/student), it promotes empowerment through creating something new, and it is an effective too for advocacy and promotes social change. I will provide examples for each of these reasons. I will discuss what the photovoice methodology is and share about the photography projects I have developed and led with Transition II students in Williamson County Schools this past year. I will walk the audience through these semester-long projects, from start to finish. The culminating activity of each project is for students to exhibit their photographs in a gallery space so that family, friends, and the community can view and celebrate their work. I will also share a 5 minute video that takes viewers through a project... photographs set to music (which I create at the end of each project and show at the exhibit reception event). Q&A time and also allow participants to view student photos (and read accompanying captions). I will also bring a camera that students use and adaptive equipment that some students use as well.

        Presenters
        avatar for Jen Vogus

        Jen Vogus

        Founder, AbleVoices


        Saturday December 7, 2019 3:20pm - 4:10pm
        Meeting Room: Ant 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        3:20pm

        Adapted Sport and Rec Opportunities to Increase Successful Transition
        Limited Capacity seats available

        In this session, we will cover the importance of providing adapted sport and recreation opportunities during adapted physical education for students with disabilities starting their individual transition program. Information will be provided on ideas and strategies to implement a wide range of sports and recreation to athletes with significant and multiple disabilities. Best practice techniques and collaboration with other professionals and the community will also be shared.

        Presenters
        avatar for Beth Foster

        Beth Foster

        Assistant Professor in Adapted Physical Education, Cal Poly Pomona University
        Follow @CPPAdaptedPE


        Saturday December 7, 2019 3:20pm - 4:10pm
        Meeting Room: Horse 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        3:20pm

        Charting the LifeCourse Family Group: Knowledge Translation via a Social Media Strategy
        Limited Capacity seats available

        This session presents preliminary findings about an online family engagement intervention guided by the Charting the Charting the LifeCourse curriculum. Presenters will share insights from family members about how this knowledge translation strategy influenced their vision for "the good life" for their sons and daughters. Presenters will share findings about how the intervention impacted families' attitudes, expectations, and activities that can lay the groundwork for effective transition planning leading to employment for young adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities. The session will also addresses how this engagement strategy and others can be accessible to all families, including those from culturally/linguistically diverse backgrounds.


        Saturday December 7, 2019 3:20pm - 4:10pm
        Meeting Room: Buzzard 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        3:20pm

        Cracks in the Continuum: A Critical Analysis of Least Restrictive Environment
        Limited Capacity seats available

        Federal laws require equitable access to education for students with disabilities through educational placement in the least restrictive environment (LRE). However, research has determined students with significant support needs (SSN) are overrepresented in segregated educational placements (Kleinert et al., 2015; Kurth, Morningstar, & Kozleski, 2014). This study explores justifications of LRE placement decisions for students with SSN through a critical qualitative analysis. Using qualitative methodology situated in a critical geography framework, three types of placement decisions for students with SSN were identified. Students with SSN were most often offered conditional placements and less frequently closed or open placements. Rationales for LRE decisions revealed barriers to accessing general education contexts related to hidden power dynamics, attempts to maintain social norms, and the use of ambiguous terminology. This research illuminates inequities relating to education placement decisions for students with SSN and recommends changes to policy and practice in order to build more inclusive school communities.

        Presenters
        avatar for Katie McCabe

        Katie McCabe

        University of Wisconsin-Madison
        avatar for Andrea Ruppar

        Andrea Ruppar

        University of Wisconsin-Madison
        avatar for Jennifer Kurth

        Jennifer Kurth

        Associate Professor, University of Kansas
        Inclusive Education


        Saturday December 7, 2019 3:20pm - 4:10pm
        Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 1 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        3:20pm

        How to Use Parents to Support Inclusion
        Limited Capacity seats available

        Research shows that being included in the general education classroom is optimal for most neurodiverse learners. More importantly, if we want children to learn how to function in society, these early interactions with their typical peers are important and lay the groundwork for later success. For teachers the thought of having one more kid with "special" needs or IEP goals to tend to can be overwhelming. Research also shows that parent involvement is an integral component for a student's trajectory in school. In this talk, I will discuss the many ways that parents can support not only an inclusive classroom, but an inclusive school and community. I will provide examples and resources for teachers across grade levels K-12.

        Presenters
        KP

        Krista Puruhito

        Lecturer, Arizona State University
        I am an Arizona native and ASU sun devil at heart. I have my master's degree in educational psychology and PhD in Family and Human Development. I am a lecturer in the Family and Human Development program at ASU and I study learning and motivation, PTSD in NICU families, and Inclusion... Read More →


        Saturday December 7, 2019 3:20pm - 4:10pm
        Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 2 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        3:20pm

        On Diversity, Inclusion, and Disability Within Nonprofit Boards of Directors
        Limited Capacity seats available

        Diversity and inclusion are hot-button issues in American society today, where marginalized people - people of color, women, and people with disabilities are demanding equity, representation, and respect in their communities, in the media, and across the world. This is no different in the boardroom. Though many people benefiting from the services and programming of nonprofit organizations are disenfranchised people, most nonprofit board members are unaffected by the issues faced by those served by the organizations they oversee. Nonprofit boards of directors have a long way to go with ensuring that the people their organizations support have representation and an equal voice at the table. Some boards have no people with disabilities serving on them, whilst others have a single person with a disability who may or may not be a fully engaged and contributing board member. When people with disabilities are not supported to authentically participating on the boards they are sitting on, they are used to give the external illusion of equity. People with disabilities — like anyone else — have the inherent right to autonomy, informed decision-making, and contributing to their communities. In soliciting and grooming board members with disabilities, nonprofit organizations and their missions become transparent, authentic, and compelling to beneficiaries and allies.

        Presenters
        avatar for Raquel Rosa

        Raquel Rosa

        Representative Payee Project Analyst, National Disability Rights Network
        Raquel is the eldest sibling of a young man who has cerebral palsy. Her career as an advocate for disability justice began 17 years ago, providing direct supports to adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. In 2010, she co-founded DC Metro Sibs, the Washington, DC-based... Read More →


        Saturday December 7, 2019 3:20pm - 4:10pm
        Meeting Room: Deer 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        3:20pm

        Pre-Service Teacher Perceptions of Students with Low Incidence Disabilities
        Limited Capacity seats available

        We know that general and special education teachers are critical to creating inclusive, diverse and equitable learning environments for all learners. What do pre-service candidates perceive are the abilities of students identified with low incidence disabilities? Can these perceptions change as a result of coursework and field experiences? This session will provide attendees with an opportunity to see how coursework and fieldwork focused on research based strategies can change pre-service candidates perceptions of student abilities (e.g.,to learn academic content, communicate effectively) and result in inclusive, equitable classrooms for all learners.

        Presenters
        avatar for Janet Sloand

        Janet Sloand

        Associate Clinical Professor, Special Education, Drexel University


        Saturday December 7, 2019 3:20pm - 4:10pm
        Meeting Room: Rattlesnake 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        3:20pm

        Purposely Involving Family Members in Employment Planning and Supports
        Limited Capacity seats available

        Family members have the potential to be strong advocates and supporters for people with disabilities in employment. Job seekers with disabilities often have close relationships with their parents, siblings, and/or extended family members who can provide important insights into their strengths, abilities, and preferences related to employment. Bringing together job seekers with disabilities, their family members, and employment specialists increases the potential for identifying employment opportunities and supporting inclusion in the workplace through their diverse perspectives and experiences. The purpose of this presentation is to describe specific considerations and strategies, identified through research and personal experiences, to support the involvement of family members in employment teams. To work more closely with families, employment specialists need to understand the changing roles of family members in relation to the person with a disability and the potential family dynamics in decision-making. Professionals should provide information about disability services, person-centered approaches, and related employment resources. To work more collaboratively, professionals should identify strategies and resources to support the involvement of family members in employment planning. Family interactions and suggestions to enhance involvement will be described.

        Presenters
        avatar for Sarah Hall

        Sarah Hall

        Research Associate, University of Minnesota


        Saturday December 7, 2019 3:20pm - 4:10pm
        Meeting Room: Coyote 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        3:20pm

        School Social Workers Road Blocks to Advocacy for Students in Inclusion
        Limited Capacity seats available

        Students with disabilities are represented in a school system by many individuals that are an active part of the IEP team. Students, families, teachers, administrators service providers and social workers play an active role in determining the student’s level of services and supports in the inclusion environment. Social workers advocate for those in need as part of their ethical responsibilities. However, despite strong advocates sometimes there are barriers to both advocating for students with disabilities, and how the advocacy is received by teachers and administrators. Historically school social workers were called “visiting teachers” and were a combination of education and social service experience. School social workers perceived legitimacy is challenged as qualifications as a school social worker varies from state to state. Teachers and administrative perceptions of expectations may differ from school social workers causing challenges in determining effectiveness. This presentation is delivered through the lens of a special education social worker with over 10 years of experience advocating and providing services to students with disabilities. The author takes an in-depth look at the power differential between school systems and advocating for children with disabilities through the lens of special education social workers advocating for students, their families, the least restrictive environment and interventions. Review of the literature including historical aspects, implications for future research and suggestions for educational stakeholders will be discussed.

        Presenters

        Saturday December 7, 2019 3:20pm - 4:10pm
        Meeting Room: Kave Ballroom 3 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226

        3:20pm

        The Personal Assistance Conundrum in Maryland: Community First Choice vs. DD Waivers
        Limited Capacity seats available

        Maryland's implementation of 1915k Community First Choice (CFC) has created significant challenges for individuals with developmental disabilities who are also eligible for HCBS waiver services. At the heart of the issue is whether the State is facilitating or inhibiting people's independence and ability to access the community as desired. Limitations in CFC along with restrictions in personal supports available under the DD waiver are creating systemwide problems, as people with the most significant disabilities are funneled into less flexible, limited CFC services with serious impacts on community inclusion, self-direction, and quality of services.

        Presenters

        Saturday December 7, 2019 3:20pm - 4:10pm
        Meeting Room: Roadrunner 5594 West Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85226
         


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